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#1 posaune

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 07:47 PM

Recently I cut and sewed a winter overcoat from a fabric called "Manteltuch" (?coat cloth?). It is made of 100% worsted wool. And it is heavy.

I ironed the fabric before cutting with a heavy iron with much steam. (But maybe I did not enough, because the fabric was heavy and 3.5 m long so the handling was tiresome).

I did the first fitting and prepared for second. To my surprise the fit was worser. It was so worse that I ripped it all  and ironed it again flat. I layed the pattern again on. The fabric had shrunk about 0.75 cm in 36 cm width. Horror. Thanks God, I had enough inlays. I am left with small seam allowance  but it fits.

All this ironing was not so good on the fabric - what do you do that the little fibers stand up again? I use a wet press cloth and my brush. Is there anything else I could do?

lg

posaune

 


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#2 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 11:55 PM

Posaune,

How discouraging. You might be able to raise the fibers with static electricity.

 

Cover the pressing table with a piece of wool, then put your fabric on it --face down; and steam.When you move the cloth the static electricity will cause the fibers to brighten. I always use a wool press cloth and table cover with wool. 

 

Another remedy that is useful for small sections--such when you've overpressed and a seam shows.

   Place the fabric wrong side up on a needle board -(or a piece of hook and loop tape --the hook piece-- if you don't have a needle board). Steam and press firmly. I use a wool cloth on the needle board. 

 

Good luck. Claire


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#3 posaune

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Posted 05 January 2015 - 08:58 PM

Thank you, Claire. Will try both of it. Peterle wrote me about Krauseminzewasser (curly mint water??) too.

I need all help I can get.

lg

heidi



#4 Schneidergott

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 06:49 AM

As far as I know, Krauseminzewasser is mainly used to get creases out of cloths like cotton, linen or hard twisted woolens.

 

Check here (German text): http://gewaendertruh...nderwasser.html

 

They do mention that it can also lift the pile back up, but I have no personal experience with that.

 

Here's a source for buying it. The price seems fair, surely cheaper than any farmacy... Shipping abroad is quite costly, though!

 

The scientific term is Aqua menthae crispae.


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#5 A TAILOR

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Posted 06 January 2015 - 02:19 PM

hi posaune

 you might try using a hair blower at high speed.



#6 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 26 April 2015 - 11:23 AM

Lots of steam and a loud zisch noise. 


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