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A Bibliography for the Cutter and Tailor


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#19 amateursarto

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Posted 03 October 2009 - 05:39 AM

If it's any help the Charles J Stone book on trouser cutting is in the trouser and waistcoat forum, under the thread titled 'STONES ADVANCED SUPERLATIVE TROUSER SYSTEM'.


thanks, i'll check it out. i hope there's someone on the forum that was trained at that school.
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#20 nzandynz

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 06:43 PM

Apart from the The American Gentleman Pattern Grader, does anyone have any suggestions on any pattern grading books.
I wanted to do some shirt grading and it is hard to find something which is mens specific.
Tried ot get my hands on the Jack hanford: Proferssional Grading for Mens and Womens book as it has great reviews but it has gone out of print....
Any thoughts? or leads, or anyone want to sell or scan the Jack Hanford book if they have one....
Thanks and goodnight from Australia.

#21 greger

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Posted 20 October 2009 - 05:40 AM

Stones coat & vest cutting and some fitting problems. 1910

#22 amateursarto

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Posted 21 October 2009 - 03:56 AM

thanks greger for posting that link. i decided to take a look at it and it really explains the anatomical study and rules which influence the system that he developed and taught at his school in chicago. this is the first book that i've looked at that explains why something is done (i'm sure that all of the systems do, but i guess that was done thru classroom instruction). his explanation of the anatomical divisions of the body and how they affect his system of cutting garments is really eye opening. i would encourage all of the beginners (like me) to take a look at his anatomical plates just to get an idea of how things come together. i have a few questions though, has anyone used this system and if so, what are your thoughts? also, is this system the same one i referenced in an earlier post above (where i inquired about the master designer's system of garment cutting for men)? (both are out of chicago). the reason i ask is because i am trying to decide on a system, and i want to understand why the drafts make sense, not just that they work. (i hope that makes sense, LOL) btw, i dl the pdf of both his coat and trousers system and am in the process of making hard copies so that i can read them without being at the computer. i also have copied the other system i referred to above as well. i'm amidst some downtime and want to get going on a few long awaited projects.

Edit: the master designer's system is not published by the charles j stone foundation. i was mistaken in my above post.

thanks
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#23 leomer

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Posted 29 November 2009 - 06:37 AM

..found this..manual:

The Tailor's manual,
or
Twenty years a New England tailor
http://books.google....tsec=frontcover

.there`s PDF to download
..@ http://books.google....page&q=&f=false

..&..more from : http://clothing.quickfound.net/
.f.ex

Free Sewing-Dressmaking Books
Pattern Making 1922
Elements of Hand Sewing 1919
Garments for Girls 1919
Manual of Home-Making 1919
Sewing & Textiles 1918
Dressmaking: A Manual 1917
Dressmaking as a Trade 1916
Dressmaking & Millinery 1916
Clothing & Health 1916
Handbook of Elementary Sewing 1915
Sewing Course for Teachers 1913
Domestic Art in Woman's Ed. 1911
Textbook on Domestic Art 1911
Sewing for Little Girls 1911
Goodwin's Course in Sewing 1910
When Mother Lets Us Sew 1910
Drafting Ladies' Clothing 1907
Hand Sewing Lessons 1905
Exercises in Hand Sewing 1904
The Complete Housekeeper 1903
Home & School Sewing 1901
Sewing & Home Dressmaking 1898
The Home Needle 1898
Elementary Needlework 1896
Art & Practice of Needlework 1895
Sewing Teachers Handbook 1893
School Needlework 1893
Gazette of Fashion 1881
The Tailor's Manual 1856



#24 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 11:18 AM

Trying to get a hold on those volumes now. Is about 300$ I saw. Must be the best available source in English language.

Whife, Archibald. A (ed.): The Modern Tailor, Outfitter and Clothier. Fourth Edition. Vol I-III. The Caxton Publishing Company, Ltd. London, 1949
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#25 Sator

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 12:44 PM

These days I think MTOC is overrated. I would sooner get Whife's A First Course in Garment Cutting, The Art of Garment Making, A First Course in Ladies' Garment Making, and Designing and Cutting Ladies' Garments separately. The only bits missing would be chapters on dress etiquette (how to wear medals at a ball, Highland dress etc), shirtmaking, window dressing and pattern grading. There isn't much on these anyway.

#26 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 30 January 2010 - 12:52 PM

I know how to wear Highland Dress :spiteful:

Honestly, stick around here long enough and Sator will have every Tailors book post 1924 posted :Big Grin:
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#27 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 12:27 AM

Well he is older (74), might have retired or even passed on =/
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#28 greger

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Posted 25 March 2010 - 06:31 AM

I read somewhere that he died within the last year or two. Sometimes I've read of people dieing only to later find out they are still among the living. Sometimes, never know.

#29 WGD

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 02:08 AM

<a href="http://www.archive.o...vancedsu01ston" target="_blank"><!--coloro:#8B0000--><span style="color:#8B0000"><!--/coloro-->Stones coat & vest cutting and some fitting problems<!--colorc--></span><!--/colorc-->.</a> 1910


In addition to the above publication, I found an entire section at http://www.archive.o...ct:"Tailoring". There are a lot of books on cutting, grading, etc. (including Croonborg's Blue [1907] and Red [1917] books) from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They are downloadable for free in a variety of formats. There are probably more that I haven't found. Apologies if this has already been posted.

#30 A TAILOR

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Posted 25 September 2010 - 06:56 AM

there is a book which i saw an ad for in an old trade mag that i bought on ebay, the practical tailor and cutter, published in the 50's by the ferris woolens company, chicago, ill, that i was wondering if anyone has any insight on. the book was published by the charles j stone foundation institute of chicago ill; it's entitled, master's design system--designing and cutting mens garments. it claims ot be a complete self instruction course on cutting mens garments. i have a chance to get it, but wanted ot know if its any good.

thanks


the ferris woolen co. was a part of the wawak c. tailors trimmings. it was on jackson blvd. it was the block that was torn down to build the sears tower.
the mag was to present practical work for tailors, and to advertise ferris wawak and the many M2M shops and small contractors in the chicago area.
the practical work was written and presented mr D.D. Bell. mr Bell was the instructor at the stone school.
i was instructed by mr Bell in 1949.
stones books delve very deeply with matching the pdttern draft with the bodys anatomy almost more than you may need to know.
i only have his trouser book. on page 16 is the basic trouser. looking at it you see a modern trouser even though the book copyright was 1913.

#31 tailleuse

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 01:43 PM

Cabrera, Roberto: Classic Tailoring. Fairchild Publications, 1983. ISBN-10: 0870054317

An absolutely essential tailoring textbook giving clear, step-by-step instructions on how to make a coat, waistcoat and trousers. The great strength is the clarity of the text and diagrams. Although it only shows one way of doing things, it is a excellent foundation from which to learn more. It lacks any instructions on certain things such as ironwork and as way as containing only rudimentary instructions on how to account for disproportion. Nonetheless, this now classical book remains the first book that any beginner should purchase.


I own this. I've read that the version on women's clothes is virtually identical, except for a chapter or two on skirts. Should I plan to buy the book or go to the library and photocopy the skirt chapters?

Tailoring. The Classic Guide to Sewing the Perfect Jacket. Creative Publishing International. Minneapolis, 2005

A rather basic book intended for home sewers. However, it has innumerable full sized colour photographs and extremely clear, step-by-step instructions. Essential introductory reading for the complete novice.


This book has great photos, as you say. Another benefit is that it offers less labor-intensive methods for people unsure if they want to commit to hand tailoring. It presents the machine method, the hand method, and the mixed method.

Thank you for these bibliographies.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#32 Sator

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 11:01 PM

I own this. I've read that the version on women's clothes is virtually identical, except for a chapter or two on skirts. Should I plan to buy the book or go to the library and photocopy the skirt chapters?


I saw an Amazon review that said this and I couldn't believe how anyone could say this. His approach to ladies' tailoring is considerably different at numerable points. There are certain ladies' coat styles discussed that aren't present at all in the men's book.

#33 Sandra B

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Posted 06 December 2010 - 06:07 PM

This is really helpful, thank you.

I have been lucky enough to have the opportunity to study Savile Row tailoring with retired master tailor, Sydney Flowers. He was trained at Henry Poole, and set up his own establishment on Carnaby St, being the first fashion business there. In 1962 he was named one of Savile Row's top 5 tailors. For the past 35 years, he has been living in Western Australia, quietly tailoring for those who knew of him, and who could afford it ;-) He's now retired, and is generously running a professional development course for a few of us lucky enough to qualify. We won't receive the full training, as it's just part-time, but it's a wonderful opportunity to learn high level skills to which we wouldn't otherwise have access.

Unfortunately, about 8 weeks ago, an elecrical fault caused a fire that destroyed his house and workroom. He and his family are all safe, but he lost everything, including his professional library. For insurance purposes, he needs to establish the value of many of the books he's lost, and I said that I'd try to help out. I'm not sure that he needs the actual books, and I actually have several of his favourites, (MTOC in particular) so I can probably find any specific information he needs, either in my collection or online, but the insurance company needs a dollar value to pay out on.

Any guidance on this matter would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
Sandra

#34 Bespoke in Auckland

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 02:59 PM

Hi sator
I am very impressed with what I have read so far on the forums. I have been on and off for a few hours and have written a few things down to try on my new jobs. It seems there are some well talented people writing here. The JP Thornton books, I have a first edition and second edition and the Second Edition is either 1897 or 94. Not sure of the date of the first but the most wonderful black and white plates. I thought I wold add this to update the information. I hope this is of help
Relly enjoying the Forums
cheers
Brendon.. bespoke in Auckland

#35 posaune

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 09:26 PM

Textbooks on Tailoring/Making up
There is a new one, very nice. From Thomas von Nordheim. Vintage Couture Tailoring. Crowood Press ISBN 978 1 847973733. It shows the sewing of a ladies jacket. Only the fonts color is a threw back. It is light grey. Bummer! Not easy to read on the glossy paper.
lg
posaune




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