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A Crisis of Masculinity?


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#73 tailleuse

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 08:03 AM

I have restrained myself for so long from launching a discussion about "Is James Bond just tailor porn"  

 

Love that scene in Skyfall where the camera pauses on Craig's hand and cuff to reveal an unbuttoned coat cuff button. Makes me laugh every time.

 

I agree that films at that level probably leave nothing visual to chance.

 

 

There's at least one blog devoted to Jame's Bond's suits.


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#74 tailleuse

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 08:06 AM

It's perhaps worth re-iterating that the article was intended to be humorous.


In an earlier comment, I suspected it might be, but the tone wasn't well-sustained. Of course, my being English would have helped.


Edited by tailleuse, 16 April 2015 - 09:55 AM.

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#75 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 16 April 2015 - 05:05 PM

I hadn't seen that thread, thanks Tailleuse, I will check it out.

 

Also it is more respectful than the tongue in cheek effort that I had imagined :D

 

Any style of humor might become uncompromising; despite the efforts of the Monty Python team, the humour is probably easier to see from Australia than America.


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 16 April 2015 - 05:19 PM.

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#76 cperry

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 09:19 AM

On 3d printers, I had read about them in a quality magazine, but I wasn't aware of the status of them.  Evidently, they've hit the home crafter market.  You can buy won for about $1699.  Thought others might enjoy seeing this, just fyi.

 

http://imaginator3d.com/dealer-info/

 

Again, it appears they're good for plastics, but not really wovens.


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#77 greger

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 01:51 PM

If you scan your body you could 3D print your own personal dummy. Fit all your personal clothes on that and stand back and see how others will see the clothes on you.
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#78 cperry

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 02:07 AM

What about it could allow the tailor to scan a client's body and have an accurate body form on hand? However, we're guessing it would be about a $3,000 body form at this point (husband's estimate). Also, I understand that it might be too personal, as the Cornell University article noted as a con to 3d scanning.

Edited by cperry, 19 April 2015 - 04:05 AM.

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#79 tailleuse

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 07:51 AM

If you scan your body you could 3D print your own personal dummy. Fit all your personal clothes on that and stand back and see how others will see the clothes on you.

 

It would be cool, but given the state and cost of the technology today it's cheaper to buy a form two sizes smaller than yourself and pad it to match your dimensions.  It's done in dress making, I don't know if men's tailors ever use this method.


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#80 tailleuse

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 07:55 AM

On 3d printers, I had read about them in a quality magazine, but I wasn't aware of the status of them.  Evidently, they've hit the home crafter market.  You can buy won for about $1699.  Thought others might enjoy seeing this, just fyi.

 

http://imaginator3d.com/dealer-info/

 

Again, it appears they're good for plastics, but not really wovens.

 

Just a couple of days ago, a menswear student showed me an interesting accessory he made with his 3D printer. It was made out of light plastic.


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#81 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 03:36 AM

Cperry - I suspect your husband's estimate at this point would be a wholesale price, as during the onset of new technological introductions, the manufacturers try to offset their development costs as quickly as possible.

My whole point was that this is the future, barring an actual Apocolypse. Fifteen to twenty years from now, a 3D printed mannequin that could cost $7500 now, could feasibly cost $750 or less. And perhaps a differentiation in clothing construction might be that someone works off of a mannequin rather than simply utilizing a 3D scan to accurately cut 2D patterns for a specific person.

Something similar has already happened in the furniture world with the advancement of the CNC router. Thirty years ago intricately cut woodworking designs could only be accomplished by a skilled craftsman. The CNC router has made intricately carved wood details available to almost every possible application- and usually with much more precision than is possible by one of us mere mortals.

Its just a matter of time for this all to be cost effective.

There is already a company based out of D.C. that is offering 3D scanning to Home Sewists. Can't remember the name at the moment, but they scan you, and then produce a viable form of you made from multiple layers of foam. They can assemble it, or give you directions to assemble yourself. The price is quite doable.

This stuff is all in its infancy still.
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