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Savile Row-trained Tailor on the Bloomberg Business Channel

Tom Mahon training of tailors tailors and the media Savile Row

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#1 tailleuse

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Posted 23 April 2015 - 07:43 AM

Tom Mahon, author of the English Cut blog, appeared on the Bloomberg Business Channel. He discussed the training of tailors. The interview is a little under 5 minutes.

http://www.englishcu...t-on-bloomberg/
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#2 hutch48

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Posted 23 April 2015 - 10:41 AM

Excellent interview.


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#3 tailleuse

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Posted 23 April 2015 - 11:18 AM

Excellent interview.


I liked it, too. He's a good spokesperson for bespoke tailors.

He also confirmed my point that traditionally tailors learn how to make up garments before they learn how to draft, usually four years for the former and three years for the latter. And that's the minimum. I'm not saying that a nonprofessional should sew clothes that don't fit, just that it's not surprising that s/he would need help.

Edited by tailleuse, 23 April 2015 - 11:24 AM.

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#4 hutch48

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Posted 23 April 2015 - 01:52 PM

I think the part that made sense to me was his emphasis on the development of trade based skills, something that is missing in much of the modern dialogue on making clothing. Making quality items, no matter what the field means the development of high skill levels and this simply takes time. I do have room for individuals who are fast learners and keen experimenters but there is no substitute for talent times effort. His comments about his earlier work were also interesting, it means he never stopped learning and if you last product is not the best you have ever made, then you need to make it again.

 

With people who have spent the time learning to make quality work, the fun part is they get a lot faster over time. Watch a real pro and they know how to do something the first time, the right order to do it in and the fastest way to get high quality results. I have a friend who is a qualified pattern maker but she spent 7 or 8 years making clothing before that and her workmanship was excellent and often on messy complex items in stretch ware. She also topped her year in patternmaking.


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#5 Henry Hall

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 08:45 AM

I liked it, too. He's a good spokesperson for bespoke tailors.He also confirmed my point that traditionally tailors learn how to make up garments before they learn how to draft, usually four years for the former and three years for the latter. And that's the minimum. I'm not saying that a nonprofessional should sew clothes that don't fit, just that it's not surprising that s/he would need help.


It's not a hard and fast rule though. On the A&S blog you can read that some have gone straight into the cutting room or moved from making to cutting to suit their talents. Des Merrion's story on his blog relates how he went straight into the cutting room and only after learning that did he go to the making-up rooms. Mahon's training was just different.

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#6 tailleuse

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 11:45 AM

Making quality items, no matter what the field means the development of high skill levels and this simply takes time. I do have room for individuals who are fast learners and keen experimenters but there is no substitute for talent times effort.

 

I love watching skilled people work. One of the reasons I try to get instruction from professionals is for the opportunity to watch how they handle material and their tools.  For example, I once was trying to smooth out some cotton fabric on a table before laying out a pattern.  My teacher laughed, whipped out a plastic ruler, put it on its side, and used it to quickly smooth out the ripples. I needed to chalk a line 1/8" from the edge.  I was measuring in, chalking, in preparation for using my French curves to connect the dots. He took my oak tag pattern piece, moved it in 1/8" and used the piece as a guide.

 

There are a million little habits that people who are well-trained and who have worked 10-hour days for years are going to develop that would never occur to a student.


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