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Frank Shattuck Anthony Bordain Jeffery Diduch bespoke tailoring Raphael Raffaelli tailoring apprenticeship

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#1 tailleuse

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 04:49 AM

Jeffery Diduch, a forum member, posted an 8-minute video about Frank Shattuck, a bespoke tailor. Anthony Bourdain ("Kitchen Confidential", etc.) interviews him and has a suit made.  It's slightly hyperbolic ("No one makes suits like him."), but very informative and entertaining.


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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 05:39 AM

It was a nice suit he made, so he knows his stuff. But you don't need 10 years and 5 years to learn it.

In a boot camp I could show you how to make a jacket in 2 - 3 months including cutting and a trouser in 1 month.

After that you can open any tailor book and you will find all kind of rubbish what is publised and holds you down trying.

 

Keep spending and trying all your life and never hit the point, after 10 years of being a slave of a tailor you might hit the point... The tailor will make sure it takes 10 years, so you cannot run away!

 

On the other hand, fox brothers have no fabric under 15 oz. LOL They produce for Sibiria. A suit of that kind you can stand in a corner like roll of tar paper.


Edited by Der Zuschneider, 30 April 2015 - 07:26 AM.

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www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#3 Henry Hall

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 08:43 AM

An honest question Zuschneider. You've said before about thick cloth and that garments made from that can stand in the corner like a roll of tar paper. I ask though, is it just the cloth or the method of making that makes stiff garments?

 

I was listening to those interviews Tailleuse linked to and the woman who makes waistcoats at A&S says she started at Huntsman, but didn't like the make-up methods. She said the famously 'firm' garments are full of layers of extra stitches that do nothing apart from stiffen the garment, making it rigid. They also make suits at A&S that are from cloths heavier than the Super 1000 transparent spider gossamer range, but these are not particularly rigid. A thick cloth doesn't have to be rigid does it?


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#4 greenlake

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 09:05 AM

On the other hand, fox brothers have no fabric under 15 oz. LOL They produce for Sibiria. A suit of that kind you can stand in a corner like roll of tar paper.

 

Fox's online selection goes down to 180/210g worsteds and a 230/260g woollen flannel, and I believe the online store isn't comprehensive. You were probably exaggerating for humor, but it makes it seem like the claims of being able to teach jackets and trousers so quickly might also be exaggerated.


Edited by greenlake, 30 April 2015 - 09:25 AM.

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#5 ChiTownTailor

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 05:01 PM

Jeffery Diduch, a forum member, posted an 8-minute video about Frank Shattuck, a bespoke tailor. Anthony Bourdain ("Kitchen Confidential", etc.) interviews him and has a suit made.  It's slightly hyperbolic ("No one makes suits like him."), but very informative and entertaining.


Nice combo; boxing and tailoring...
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-There might be a lot of tweed merchants out there making a bodger, but I'm sure not one of them. I'd rather be kicking my heels than making a pork on the mangle. No crushed beetles to be found here!

#6 jukes

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 03:34 PM

Beautiful well made suit by a real craftsman.



#7 Henry Hall

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 07:10 PM

Interesting chap. Rather a bare workroom too. No sign of a $5000 Juki or a suction board at all. He must have hidden them away to heighten the drama :) .


Edited by Henry Hall, 01 May 2015 - 07:11 PM.

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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#8 ChiTownTailor

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 07:34 PM

No sign of a $5000 Juki or a suction board at all. He must have hidden them away to heighten the drama :) .


LOL 😆

Edited by ChiTownTailor, 01 May 2015 - 07:35 PM.

-There might be a lot of tweed merchants out there making a bodger, but I'm sure not one of them. I'd rather be kicking my heels than making a pork on the mangle. No crushed beetles to be found here!

#9 jukes

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 08:03 PM

No drama at all, he is old school and does not need either a Juki or a suction table to produce a top class product.

I used to have four guitars, didn't make me play any better.


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#10 Henry Hall

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 08:08 PM

Veritably. It's what I was hinting at with mild irony.


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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#11 greger

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 05:24 AM

I like the old school.
Grandad made the finest clothes I've seen. What did he use? A hefty iron, press mitt, tailors ham, sleeve roll, two types of chalk, thimble, needles, pins, thread, press cloth, water, bench, shears and snips.
Sewing machines are fast, but what control of the cloth have you lost?
Vacuum press is fast, but rather limited.
The last two sounds like mass-production methods, as it is cheaper art. Nothing wrong with cutting corners to bring the cost down for those with less money. Even some wealthy don't care for clothes that much. Hand sewing as good as a machine what good is that? Sewing better than machines is more valuable, and this can be fast (the old days they had to be as fast as they could). Flat pressing has its place, but does it do everything? Vacuum press and steam irons do they not leave dimples?
Cheaper clothes the fastest way possible. Laminated cloth, like goretex, is probably best sewn by machine. Being versatile is wise.
We as individuals can only judge by what we have seen and felt, and rarely by what others say.

#12 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 07:59 AM

Beautiful well made suit by a real craftsman.

 

First class! Did you notice the leaf edge collar. I wonder if DZ can do one that neat. And did you notice the old Singer industrial treadle (I think it was) the way he back tacked with the pulley wheel.

 

I enjoyed that part at the end when they sat down for a drink. I think I will have a little one before bed!


Edited by MANSIE WAUCH, 02 May 2015 - 08:00 AM.

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#13 tailleuse

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 11:09 AM

Interesting chap. Rather a bare workroom too. No sign of a $5000 Juki or a suction board at all. He must have hidden them away to heighten the drama :) .

 

The Jukis, Brothers, and Singers the tailors and students I know use don't cost anything near $5,000 even when brand new.  They are the modern-day equivalent of an older Singer machine, which has been recommended here before, along with modern industrials to people seriously pursuing the field.  Older machines that make a good stitch are fine if you can find and maintain them.  A Sussman gravity iron and ironing board or the equivalent is an investment, but again, professional tailors often find such equipment worthwhile.


Edited by tailleuse, 02 May 2015 - 11:10 AM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#14 tailleuse

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 11:15 AM

 Sewing better than machines is more valuable, and this can be fast (the old days they had to be as fast as they could). ... Vacuum press and steam irons do they not leave dimples?
 

 

Even the fanciest couture ateliers and bespoke establishments use sewing machines for certain limited functions: There's nothing

déclassé about it. Maybe I've seen only good people, but a vacuum press pedal and steam irons don't leave dimples if you know how to press. I have seen people use other methods, such as wetting a piece of muslin, wringing it out, placing it on a seam and placing an iron on top to slowly infuse the fabric with steam, but that's a choice dependent on the fabric and the time available.


Edited by tailleuse, 02 May 2015 - 11:21 AM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#15 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 02:02 PM

Greger - I'm curious- why two types of chalk?
Maybe two colors?

#16 jukes

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 04:48 PM

First class! Did you notice the leaf edge collar. I wonder if DZ can do one that neat. And did you notice the old Singer industrial treadle (I think it was) the way he back tacked with the pulley wheel.
 
I enjoyed that part at the end when they sat down for a drink. I think I will have a little one before bed!


Noticed the leaf edge, very difficult to execute correctly, was trying to get a glimpse of the breast pocket but couldnt. They don't teach that stuff anymore, also admired the total respect he had for his master and craft. That suit will still be around in many years to come due to the quality of workmanship and materials used (cloth being one) which is more than can be said of today's throwaway goods, and noticeably he alluded to that fact when the customer was choosing his cloth.
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#17 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 03:00 AM

Noticed the leaf edge, very difficult to execute correctly, was trying to get a glimpse of the breast pocket but couldnt. They don't teach that stuff anymore, also admired the total respect he had for his master and craft. That suit will still be around in many years to come due to the quality of workmanship and materials used (cloth being one) which is more than can be said of today's throwaway goods, and noticeably he alluded to that fact when the customer was choosing his cloth.

 

You keep up the standard!


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#18 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 03 May 2015 - 03:20 AM

I have just watched the video again. memories, memories. ( I think I will have another drink later.)


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Frank Shattuck, Anthony Bordain, Jeffery Diduch, bespoke tailoring, Raphael Raffaelli, tailoring apprenticeship

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