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Menefreghismo: Analysis of a Neapolitan coat by Jeffery Diduch

Jeffery Diduch Menefreghismo Neapolitan Tailoring sloppy work

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#37 hutch48

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 04:29 PM

I know a lady up the road from me who paid $800.00 AU for a designer dress from Japan that was made fully of circles of fabric but it seriously looked like it had been cut out with a knife and fork, the edges were not secured so it would fray in a washing machine, the stitching was crap and the general finish was poor. Interestingly enough it was not a bad design and it looked OK if you were not too close to it. I suggested that she pull it apart, make a new pattern from the original then make it properly. This was unusual because the Japanes are usually very good at what they do in terms of craftsmanship.



#38 greger

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 03:02 AM

How many people are involved? The customer. The main tailor. And a contract tailor. And the customer received the coat by mail? Surely the customer didn't walk out of the shop with it, unless he wanted it that way. (Maybe he was drunk?) Heard plenty of stories where someone didn't like somebody and did crazy stuff to that person so they don't come back. Reputations lost? Depending on who you are listening to. It might be the customer, or the shop owner. I've heard shop owners tell stories like this with great mirth, whatever kind of business they are in.

#39 jukes

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 04:28 AM

The suit was apparently bespoke, so the pockets would have been in at one of the fitting stages, which means the customer would have seen them before handing over final payment, so whether received by mail or collected, the defects would have been spotted before completion.

#40 greger

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 07:24 AM

I can understand a wealthy custom wanting a fitted coat (comfortable) but looking like a poor man's coat. The problem with this argument is that the stripes on the flaps are off to much.

Is there a competition for who can wear the worst coat?
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#41 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 12:39 PM

I still say its a joke.

The coat started out good. Then maybe the customer cancelled, died, skipped town, went to prison, whatever....or maybe the cutter had a bad brain moment and screwed up the original cut...something happened so that different people began adding their own touches of "awful"...the bad stuff is truly just too bad. It had to have been done on purpose.

Edited by SPOOKIETOO, 25 June 2015 - 12:41 PM.


#42 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 12:42 PM

Look how much discussion is still going on about this thing and look how long it has survived!
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#43 carpu65

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 04:20 AM

How many people are involved? The customer. The main tailor. And a contract tailor. And the customer received the coat by mail? Surely the customer didn't walk out of the shop with it, unless he wanted it that way. (Maybe he was drunk?) Heard plenty of stories where someone didn't like somebody and did crazy stuff to that person so they don't come back. Reputations lost? Depending on who you are listening to. It might be the customer, or the shop owner. I've heard shop owners tell stories like this with great mirth, whatever kind of business they are in.

I think that the explanation is this:

The customer was a wealthy man without any idea about bespoke,cut,finiture.

He was in Naples and wanted a bespoke suit from this firm (Solito) because he knew that bespoke suit are prestigious.

The tailor have understood that this customer was interested only to the label.

Now is a thing to know about Neapolitan tailors: they deep despise the customer ignorant.

A typical thing that the famous Neapolitan tailor said is "i want the customer to my level,exigent (you can hear this also in the dvd o' mast).

So in front a this sartorial simpleton the tailor not give the best ("in every case is content").

The poor guy were not even able to understand the defects of his suit.

 

This is,in my opinion how the events took place.

I know,i know,is not honest,is not polite,is not proper...but they do so.

Especially in Naples.

 
 
 
 

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#44 tailleuse

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 04:30 AM

 Heard plenty of stories where someone didn't like somebody and did crazy stuff to that person so they don't come back.

 

I've heard some from the dressmaking side. Funny how the people telling these stories don't realize how mean-spirited and unprofessional they come off in the telling. Of course, some customers are difficult -- I've laughed at the "Things You Should Not Do At The Tailor's" thread -- but there are better ways to handle the situation.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#45 jukes

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 06:20 AM

I think that the explanation is this:


The customer was a wealthy man without any idea about bespoke,cut,finiture.
He was in Naples and wanted a bespoke suit from this firm (Solito) because he knew that bespoke suit are prestigious.
The tailor have understood that this customer was interested only to the label.
Now is a thing to know about Neapolitan tailors: they deep despise the customer ignorant.
A typical thing that the famous Neapolitan tailor said is "i want the customer to my level,exigent (you can hear this also in the dvd o' mast).
So in front a this sartorial simpleton the tailor not give the best ("in every case is content").
The poor guy were not even able to understand the defects of his suit.
 
This is,in my opinion how the events took place.
I know,i know,is not honest,is not polite,is not proper...but they do so.
Especially in Naples.

Well, if that is the case, I hope customers give Naples a very wide berth. There is taking the piss, but that takes the biscuit. Are you seriously telling us that the tailors in Naples treat customers who pay good money in this manner ?



#46 carpu65

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 09:38 AM

Not everyone, of course....but i have see other times a second rate and hasty work on a suit for a customer

inexperienced and unprepared.
Solito's style can like or not,but for sure he is a good tailor.
I not have none other explanation for that mess.
And the fact that the customer not have protested  or complained for the work,but have withdrew the suit

is a clue.


Edited by carpu65, 26 June 2015 - 12:59 PM.


#47 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 12:39 PM

I would bet Carpu65 is correct :)

 

Isn't the world a lovely place .. . .


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 26 June 2015 - 12:42 PM.

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#48 tailleuse

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Posted 26 June 2015 - 10:55 PM

Jeffery Diduch has posted the back story of the suit, which he translated and condensed from the the tailor's website.

 

I'm still a little puzzled, however. I'm an amateur who's only taken classes and I never would have thought the details on the jacket were acceptable.


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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#49 carpu65

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Posted 27 June 2015 - 12:09 AM

In his website when Solito talk about of amazement of his customer and of "disaster",means that the customer was not wont to Neapolitan soft school,

not that he make not matching pattern and bad pockets and interiors.

He talk about comfort,not ugly tailoring.

So the reason for the mess is not in the "philosophy" or in the cut of the house.

They worked bad,because that customer would not notice and was equally happy.

Remember that at the time of that suit,he were a almost unknown tailor shop with barely only Neapolitan customers (very,very more 

exacting compared to the neive customer of the disaster suit).
Now are a renowned,international  tailor house very more expensive tht at the time of the infamous suit.
So,i think that similiar things  not happen anymore.

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#50 greger

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Posted 27 June 2015 - 06:40 AM

What's acceptable from one group of people can be amazingly different to other groups.

There is always the question of what is more important, fit or looks? It nice to have both, but sometimes a person has to choose. But it should never be this big of a choice. The slop was too incredibly. The tailor must have done 1/10 of his apprenticeship, or less.

In one of the replies the person wrote, "Is the customer that forms the tailor", (")is a old phrase("). Many tailors have been shaped by this. That, or, for some of them, go out of business. But I think it is mostly the tailor and customer exploring ideas where the details are settled upon. Tailors that are inflexible are they really tailors?
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#51 jukes

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 07:24 AM

If the customer and tailor were not bothered about looks or fit, just comfort, then maybe he should have sold him a pair of Pyjama,s.


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#52 greger

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 08:48 AM

Or, a bath robe.

#53 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 02:37 AM

I, for one, have always found examples of how not to do something quite useful during a learning curve. Unfortunately/fortunately, it is rare that one is able to get paid while churning out the lesser quality examples.

 

So long as one learns from their own mistakes and the mistakes of others, all is good.

 

But oy vey! How difficult it is to have to deal with someone that "never makes mistakes."

 

The worst kind of coworker/employee/employer there is!


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#54 jukes

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Posted 30 June 2015 - 03:48 AM

There is no such person, who has never made a mistake.
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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Jeffery Diduch, Menefreghismo, Neapolitan Tailoring, sloppy work

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