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Oral history of Savile Row


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#1 Measure Man

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Posted 27 June 2015 - 04:27 AM

https://vimeo.com/125281607

 

Found this on Style Forum


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#2 hutch48

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Posted 27 June 2015 - 02:06 PM

Excellent documentary and well worth watching.


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#3 tailleuse

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Posted 28 June 2015 - 07:41 AM

I posted an early version or the same thing in April. http://www.cutterand...?showtopic=4068


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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#4 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 06:32 AM

I enjoyed watching that, brought back many memories. I was a bit surprised that the old tailors and the older lady tailoress did not use the tailoring expressions, such as open coat, basting out, basting under, when trying to explain the work they did. I also felt for the tailor who was asked to name the pressing block! Although he explained its use correctly, and it was second nature to him in use, he had never given any thought to what it was called. ( I think a 'pressing thingy' would suffice!)

 

If anyone would like to know what it was realty like in the in the old days. See if you can still get Charles Kingsley's book 'Alton Lock' it gives a good description of conditions in Victorian London, and the conditions of the outworkers in the tailoring trade of the times. It is long out of print, but some library may be able to obtain a copy.

 

Old memories! I should jot mine down before its too late.


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#5 jukes

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 07:29 AM

Yes Mansie, you should and while your at it we need a book on your drafting system and a book on pattern grading, when that is finished you can start writing a history of style from the time you started in the trade to the present day.
That little lot should keep you busy for a couple of weeks.

Edited by jukes, 01 July 2015 - 07:32 AM.

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#6 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 07:08 PM

Hi Jukes

 

I have thought of it many times, but it is so long ago since I drafted the original pattern, and made so many adjustment over the years as fashions changed. I will have to go down to the cellar of the museum of my mind to see if it is there. (I am frightened of what I might find!)

 

The nearest I have seen which is similar to my pattern, is the draft by 'Poulin' I think it was posted on the forum somewhere.

 

Maybe I might try just the basics, with some grading thrown in.


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#7 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 07:16 PM

You can be certain that many folks would like to see that Mansie.


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#8 jukes

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Posted 01 July 2015 - 10:02 PM

Hi Jukes
 
I have thought of it many times, but it is so long ago since I drafted the original pattern, and made so many adjustment over the years as fashions changed. I will have to go down to the cellar of the museum of my mind to see if it is there. (I am frightened of what I might find!)
 
The nearest I have seen which is similar to my pattern, is the draft by 'Poulin' I think it was posted on the forum somewhere.
 
Maybe I might try just the basics, with some grading thrown in.


Maybe three books in the Hostek format (spiral bound college books)
1. Mens Trousers and waistcoats basic drafts and manipulations
2. Mens Coats and overcoats basic drafts and manipulations
3. Men's pattern Grading by the maestro
Put them on the internet @ £10.00 per copy and retire to the Bahamas

Put me down for two of each.

On a serious note, I wish I still had my cutting/drafting books from when i was at the London College of Fashion.

Edited by jukes, 01 July 2015 - 10:05 PM.

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#9 greger

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 06:20 AM

"basic drafts and manipulations"

Mom explained the difference between sports costs and blazers. Decades later I forgot. Asked the question again and somebody gave the same answer. Didn't write it down and already forgot again. Where in the world are these definitions written down? The younger generations use these names interchangeable.

#10 tailleuse

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:13 AM

"basic drafts and manipulations"

Mom explained the difference between sports costs and blazers. Decades later I forgot. Asked the question again and somebody gave the same answer. Didn't write it down and already forgot again. Where in the world are these definitions written down? The younger generations use these names interchangeable.

 

Do you agree with this explanation?  Were you thinking of something more technical?


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#11 greger

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 07:47 AM

Don't think he knows, not to mention some errors. Did he mention navel reefers as blazers?

One to three sentences from someone who knows clearly separated the two garments.

#12 jukes

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 06:56 PM

A Blazer is worn by sports clubs / public schools etc and has specially selected materials - example, boldly striped cottons (think boating / rowing clubs)



#13 Schneiderfrei

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 08:34 PM

Next to my sons school rowing rooms, there is the Adelaide Rowing Club who claim to be Izingari sportsmen.

 

Their blazers are just as Jukes described, boldly striped, though invariably appallingly fitted and atrociously tailored.  

 

I'm certain the Ponsonby's and Penruddocke Long's would be turning in their graves.


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#14 Learner

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Posted 02 July 2015 - 10:39 PM

A Blazer is worn by sports clubs / public schools etc and has specially selected materials - example, boldly striped cottons (think boating / rowing clubs)

When I was at school (which was over thirty years ago), blazers (usually black, less commonly grey, and occasionally some other colour entirely) were pretty much a ubiquitous part of the school uniform at all UK secondary schools, and some primary schools, for boys at least.  "Posher" schools (which is what "public school" connotes in the UK (I'm aware that it has a different meaning in the US) were rather less likely to have a blazer as part of the uniform. 

 

Striped blazers were more for "messing about in boats" a la Jerome K Jerome (http://www.moviemail...?stillID=102892) than for rowing clubs - although some rowing clubs wore/wear striped blazers, they're just as likely to have worn blazers with trimmed edges like the jacket worn by Patrick McGoohan in The Prisoner:

 

wpf96f83ae_06.png

 

NB: this is not the Prisoner jacket, it's a Kingston Grammar School Boat Club blazer.  I chose this picture because it illustrates the original salient feature of the blazer from which its name derives; the blazing red colour.  The earliest blazers were worn by the Lady Margaret Boat Club, in 1825.  The Wikipedia entry on blazers cites a letter published in the London Daily News in 1889 which states:

 

"A blazer is the red flannel boating jacket worn by the Lady Margaret, St. John's College, Cambridge, Boat Club. When I was at Cambridge it meant that and nothing else. It seems from your article that a blazer now means a colored flannel jacket, whether for cricket, tennis, boating, or seaside wear". 

 

The article also suggests that the striped jackets associated with boating were called blazers because a striped jacket was part of the uniform of the crew of the HMS Blazer.

 

There may, at some point in time in the US, have been some specific distinction between a "California Tuxedo"-type blazer and a sports coat, but I don't think it's a universal one.


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#15 jukes

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 02:50 AM

Specially selected materials include braiding and club badges on the breast pocket.
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#16 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 03:48 AM

Here is a selection of Public school blazers from about 1910 to 1920. All are authentic photos of a Summer camp held annually for underprivileged kids. The older boys are from a famous public school. The kids are scalawags from the same background as myself.

 

 I might add I am not on any of these photos, I may be old, but I am not that old.

 

Attached File  Blazers1.jpg   39.17KB   4 downloads

Attached File  Blazers2.jpg   51.55KB   0 downloads

Attached File  Blazers3.jpg   44.15KB   0 downloads


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#17 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 03:59 AM

I should have added, that it is hard to define what is a blazer from one era to another.

 

A suit jacket speaks for its self - it's a jacket as part of a suit of clothes.

 

A sports I would normally expect to be made of tweed or such fabrics.

 

A blazer could be made like a suit jacket besides being made up like a light summer jacket

 

A summer jacket is another style not mentioned. usually made up unlined or buggy lined, usually for the tropics, and can also be made as part of a lightweight suit, also made for the tropics.

 

There are no hard and fast rules, as suggested in the link supplied. They could all be made of any of the material mentioned.


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#18 Henry Hall

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Posted 03 July 2015 - 05:03 AM

I was a part of a rowing club from the school (not a posh one) and we had maroon and white (!) blazers. They were quite thin and I can't even remember if they were lined. Cheap goods no doubt.


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