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Can seersucker jacket shrinkage be predicted?


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#1 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 09:06 AM

I want to wash and dry any RTW cotton seersucker jacket, but need to know how much shrinkage will occur. Seersucker is lightweight. Is a linen jacket dry cleaned as clean as when washed in water? If not, washing by water seems more hygienic, and perhaps less damaging to the environment. Thus arises the necessity to know how much a RTW seersucker jacket shrinks?

Edited by Naive Jr, 06 August 2015 - 07:16 AM.

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#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 12:02 PM

I love seersucker coats. They are very nice to have.


Edited by Der Zuschneider, 05 August 2015 - 11:53 AM.

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#3 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 12:14 PM

Kent Wang, located in Texas (I love the critical judgment of authentic Texans against totalitarianism) offers a WASHABLE seersucker jacket, although sadly the RTW is without sleeve buttonholes and available only regular length. If I knew in advance if and how to generate shrinkage, I could consciously alter its size!

Edited by Naive Jr, 06 August 2015 - 05:19 PM.

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#4 DanMartin

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 01:04 PM

I read the original text in an email. If you are having a seersucker jacket made up, you can wash the fabric without soap and heat dry it before making itup in order to have a preshrunk jacket which will no longer shrink. then line dry.

#5 Naive Jr

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 03:40 PM

Excellent! Thank you very much, Dan Martin! What if the seersucker jacket is alrady made up?
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#6 Henry Hall

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 04:37 AM

Then clearly it's too late to pre-shrink it. 

 

Buy a piece of seersucker, cut it into pieces and wash them in different ways and see what the results are.


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#7 Schneidergott

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Posted 05 August 2015 - 05:38 AM

I'm quite certain this is about ordering another suit/ jacket/ trouser online, only this time made from seersucker.

 

1) Check the inside wash label if the garment is washable by hand

 

waschsymbole.jpg

 

Whatever the material, the safest option would be a dry cleaner with a steam finisher.


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#8 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 05:09 AM

Why seersucker? Because seersucker is lightweight and washable. Cotton and cotton-mix RTW trousers from various English sources often have such labels agsinst wash and for dry cleaning. These trousers are washable, although labeled otherwise.

RTW men's jacket manufacturers in UK and Ireland seldom offer (explicitly) washable jackets. Exceptions: Brook Taverner and that famous department store in London I believe bespoke tailor Thomas Mahon recommends for those who look for a good non-bespoke suit. But the cut of such washable jackets as well as other aesthetic factors is questionable and the cloth often mixed with synthetic, but not merely for stretch, see New & Lingwood RTW. Who wants to wash any jacket and discover afterwards a certain part of it has been damaged?


Possibly Italy, where in warmer weather RTW men's jackets are unlined or half-lined, are many such washable and preshrunk jackets. So I sent an inquiry to Gagliardi Malta if their RTW seersucker jacket is washable. [see #17]

The subject of washability and shrinkage of men's seersucker RTW jackets is hardly if at all present online in the English language. It cannot suffice to merely state a certain shrinkage of sleeve length, shrinkage in chest and waist measurements is possible and crucial.

Edited by Naive Jr, 07 August 2015 - 09:04 AM.

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#9 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:22 AM

Then clearly it's too late to pre-shrink it. 
 
Buy a piece of seersucker, cut it into pieces and wash them in different ways and see what the results are.

I see no reason why your proposal could be go wrong. So I must obtain samples of the seersucker in question, and experiment. I can only say I hoped there had been research about seersucker shrinkage done. In other words, the amount of shrinkage of seersucker cloth which results from washing at various degrees of water and drying at various degrees of heat has not been generalised because it cannot be generalised?

Fazit: shrinkage and shrinkage prediction is outside the domain of bespoke tailoring because bespoke is dry cleaned.

Edited by Naive Jr, 06 August 2015 - 07:42 AM.

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#10 Henry Hall

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 10:35 AM

If you need to know that much, then try it out, but really I was being mildly sarcastic. To be honest I think you're making way too much of this seersucker shrinkage thing. As in the post from SG, if the coat has a label and says you can wash it, just follow the label's requirements. If it has no label then you're on your own and that's the reason they didn't put a label in saying you could wash it (which means it might shrink and the manufacturer doesn't want to be responsible)!


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#11 greger

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 10:51 AM

Tailors have made clothes of all kinds of natural cloth. And, how long has dry cleaning existed? Dad's navy clothes were hand washed, and when the battle ship got some washing machines they went into that. Most of his clothes were wool. Got to use the right soap.

Cotton, some jeans are "shrink to fit". Other jeans are pre-shrunk.

The coat you are looking at should have a label giving directions for washing. Follow those directions. If you don't like, then buy a different coat. You should be able to see on line the cleaning directions to see if that is what you want to buy.

Edited by greger, 06 August 2015 - 10:53 AM.


#12 cthomas

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 04:12 PM

If it has no label then you're on your own and that's the reason they didn't put a label in saying you could wash it (which means it might shrink and the manufacturer doesn't want to be responsible)!

 

I highly doubt any RTW brand would choose to omit putting in the wash/care-labels just to avoid responsibility. They will just put in a safer option like 'dry-cleaning only' or maybe 'hand-wash' label.


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#13 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 06:41 PM

If you need to know that much, then try it out, but really I was being mildly sarcastic. To be honest I think you're making way too much of this seersucker shrinkage thing. As in the post from SG, if the coat has a label and says you can wash it, just follow the label's requirements. If it has no label then you're on your own and that's the reason they didn't put a label in saying you could wash it (which means it might shrink and the manufacturer doesn't want to be responsible)!

Your remark you wrote with some sarcasm helps me to interpret. I get the impression seersucker is hardly a choice for bespoke tailoring. If I ask German native speakers if there is a German word for it, they tell me seersucker is for bed.

Just because I do NOT intend to "follow the label's requirements", I imagined there are readers here who are seersucker experts and know its shrinkage snd put my qusstion. I acknowledge your benevolent interest and initiative that you post, but I recognise that you cannot understand my question as serious because you cannot imagine anyone wanting to shrink a RTW seersucker jacket. Everybody you know could at least order a washable seersucker jacket in the interpretation and manufacture of Kent Wang and if needed MTM for sleeve buttonholes and all other necessary alterations.
I also acknowledge your additional point of label function to protect the manufacture LEGALLY i.e. financial "responsibility".

Edited by Naive Jr, 06 August 2015 - 07:42 PM.

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#14 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:06 PM

Tailors have made clothes of all kinds of natural cloth. And, how long has dry cleaning existed? Dad's navy clothes were hand washed, and when the battle ship got some washing machines they went into that. Most of his clothes were wool. Got to use the right soap.
Cotton, some jeans are "shrink to fit". Other jeans are pre-shrunk.
The coat you are looking at should have a label giving directions for washing. Follow those directions. If you don't like, then buy a different coat. You should be able to see on line the cleaning directions to see if that is what you want to buy.

After I smelled the result of dry cleaning for which I paid not an insignificant pittance to get dry cleaned, my ex-girlfriend volunteered to hand wash and iron my RTW Solbiati linen jacket to achieve fresh and lovely. Before this operation I wrote the director of the clothes establishment where I bought the jacket and asked him what he thinks, but got no reply. My experience with RTW clothes retailers and msnufacturers in UK and Ireland, where I have always bought most of my clothes to support better working conditions: Thou shalt not wash. I want to wash, preferably by machine, and dry, too. (Bill's Driving Twill Pants, of German weave with 1% stretch to 99% cotton, made in USA, were not damaged by drying by machine. I believe its label expresses approval of machine drying.)

Edited by Naive Jr, 07 August 2015 - 09:16 AM.

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#15 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:10 PM

I highly doubt any RTW brand would choose to omit putting in the wash/care-labels just to avoid responsibility. They will just put in a safer option like 'dry-cleaning only' or maybe 'hand-wash' label.


RTW brands do not neglect to label because without labels they are "responsible" (legally, financialky).
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#16 hutch48

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:39 PM

If you want a description, try this link,

https://en.wikipedia...wiki/Seersucker

If you need to determine the characteristics of a product made from this fabric, purchase a length of the exact fabric, accurately measure it then wash it according to you normal manner then after you have dried it, measure it again. For what you would pay for a jacket made of this fabric, no manufacturer would waste there time responding to your enquiries. If you were paying for the work and time to custom make the garment by a tailor, he/she would be able to tell you.

 

In this world you get what you pay for and as you are not paying anyone and asking questions that probably cannot be answered by remote control, the onus is on you to test what you need and draw your own conclusions, not go out of your way to be a pest in a tailoring forum when what you are asking about is cheap RTW that no-one would be familiar with.

 

You are lucky a moderator has not closed this topic as well as you earlier ones.



#17 Naive Jr

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:52 PM

The title of my thread is: Can seersucker shrinkage [of <practical garments> see Hutch] be predicted? I intend to wash RTW seersucker jackets. If my size is 38S, I need to know If I should expect more or less shrinkage. Hutch's Wikipedia article is a description of seersucker in certain aspects, not shrinkage. Hutch's Wikipedia article presents seersucker in such a way that one could not easily imagine it as belonging to "luxury fabrics", a term used by a flannel expert who did not mention the effect of sweat when I asked how to care for my first flannel jacket made by her firm. After my new jacket of flannel of that mill was pilled, etc. her boss joked he heard I'd "rolled up sleeves" - to divert from the true cause of damage. Who is "responsible"?

The Gagliardi representative just replied their seersucker jacket must be dry cleaned because it is FUSED. So I asked what happens to the fusing when the jacket is washed and mentioned this thread asking about seersucker shrinkage in the Cutter & Tailor forum open to non-professionals. [see #8]

But sure Hutch knows best <Down Under> which big snipper cuts seersucker best.

I believe to have learned in this thread seersucker is for warmer climates than where most of the bespoke tailors here work, and bespoke tailors are dependent on dry cleaning because of the materials they use in clothes. Thus my question about shrinkage of seersucker cannot be answered by bespoke tailors who seldom use it and expect their clothes to be dry cleaned. And to be a bespoke tailor does not mean to be concerned about RTW, unless RTW has an effect on bespoke. Since bespoke avoids fusing, the influence of washing seersucker jackets which are fused remained unspoken. Thanks to big snipper expert Hutch's Wikipedia article I learned seersucker is considered socially inferior by those who count "in this world".

Edited by Naive Jr, 07 August 2015 - 09:19 AM.

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#18 Henry Hall

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Posted 06 August 2015 - 07:54 PM

 

I highly doubt any RTW brand would choose to omit putting in the wash/care-labels just to avoid responsibility. They will just put in a safer option like 'dry-cleaning only' or maybe 'hand-wash' label.

 

That's what I meant. The dry-clean only label would be there in lieu of a wash label.


Edited by Henry Hall, 06 August 2015 - 07:55 PM.

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).





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