Jump to content


Photo

Anderson & Sheppard Blog: The "Finished"Product

Anderson & Sheppard Finishing Buttonholes

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 tailleuse

tailleuse

    Master

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,059 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Tailoring and couture.

Posted 13 August 2015 - 04:21 AM

"A lesser explored aspect of bespoke tailoring is that of garment finishing. Once a customer has had his first fitting the garment is sent back to his coat maker. From this point onwards the garment is classed as a ‘finisher’."

 

The Notebook: The '\"Finished" Product


  • ChiTownTailor likes this

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#2 Der Zuschneider

Der Zuschneider

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,429 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:TX, Houston
  • Interests:- German Cutting Systems
    - Modern Tailoring by German Semi-Traditional Standards

Posted 13 August 2015 - 10:01 AM

Hintere Aermelnaht falsch, weil nicht verlegt, Knoepflocher falsch, weil Aermelsaum ist faslch und Fadenlauf ist auch falsch. Cruel Garbage, paople paying thousands for it.


  • Scyestitch likes this
www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#3 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 13 August 2015 - 10:47 AM

Have you ever worn a coat made by them?
  • tailleuse likes this

#4 MANSIE WAUCH

MANSIE WAUCH

    Pro

  • Professional
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 686 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North West, England

Posted 14 August 2015 - 07:09 AM

Did  you know, the origin of real hole cuffs; started with the Victorian surgeons, who needed to roll up the sleeves of their fine frock coats, when operating. Thus avoiding blood splashes.


  • tailleuse, cperry and Schneiderfrei like this

#5 tailleuse

tailleuse

    Master

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,059 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Tailoring and couture.

Posted 14 August 2015 - 01:08 PM

Did  you know, the origin of real hole cuffs; started with the Victorian surgeons, who needed to roll up the sleeves of their fine frock coats, when operating. Thus avoiding blood splashes.

 

They're called "surgeon's cuffs".


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#6 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 14 August 2015 - 01:17 PM

Thought they were around before the Civil War. Maybe that is the Victorian era?

#7 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 14 August 2015 - 07:46 PM

They're on the sleeves of Elizabethan clothes too, on doublets. The sleeves were very tight and needed to be buttoned into place. I saw a picture of one where the buttons go halfway up the arm!

 

They've been called surgeon cuffs for ages though, so maybe buttoning sleeves disappeared and were then taken up again and popularised by Surgeons in the 19th century?


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#8 tailleuse

tailleuse

    Master

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,059 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Tailoring and couture.

Posted 15 August 2015 - 02:58 AM

Thought they were around before the Civil War. Maybe that is the Victorian era?

 

Her reign began in 1837, so well before the U.S. Civil War.


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#9 cperry

cperry

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 181 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Minnesota USA
  • Interests:Fine sewing for children, English smocking, tailoring for women and men

Posted 16 August 2015 - 03:32 AM

My husband started wearing a dress shirt with buttoned cuffs (French cuffs?).  A younger guy approached him recently and said, 'hey, I love French cuffs, where did you get that shirt?'  I don't think they are as common in our parts...  They give my husband a reason to wear the cuff links that belonged to his grandfather.  It was a sale shirt from Charles Tyrwhitt.  Nice cloth, and they work okay for now.

 

Fun to learn the history of them.


  • tailleuse likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Anderson & Sheppard, Finishing, Buttonholes

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users