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Pressing Donkey


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#1 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 03:19 AM

If anyone is within striking distance of Southport, Lancashire. There is a pressing donkey for sale. It is in a collectors/Charity workshop type shop in the arcades behind the town hall. It is all wood but, looks professionally made. I don't think it would be expensive but, It would have to be collected from the store. I explained to the store-keeper, what it was, as he had no idea. I suggested he put it on Ebay as there would be some interest from people. Good luck to whoever gets it.

 

I did not purchase it myself as I already have one.   


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#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 30 August 2015 - 08:20 AM

Can I see a picture of a pressing donkey?


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www.berlinbespokesuits.com

#3 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 03:56 AM

Can I see a picture of a pressing donkey?

 

Hello DZ. It's just the double sleeve board stand that the old time pressors' used to press off the coats. It was commonly called a donkey! you must have seen one or used one?


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#4 greger

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Posted 31 August 2015 - 06:01 AM

The old tailors you were around did they all use a donkey? Did some have other methods of pressing?
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#5 MANSIE WAUCH

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 08:41 AM

Hello gregor!

 

The pressing donkey was shaped like a double sleeve board, one being the base, the other the working surface. One end wider than the other. The bespoke presser used to press everything off, on the donkey. It would be about 27 inches in length and about 10 inches in height. his only other equipment would be a damp rag a piece of linen for pressing off!  A bucket of water for soaking the damp rag, a little piece of hard soap (used for the seams). A sponge made out of a roll of waste cloth, one end cut to resemble a brush, again for the seams. a couple of 16 pound goose irons. One on and one off the gas ring, to keep a constant heat. To check the iron was not too hot, he would spit on the face of the iron, it either sizzled or bounced off the iron like a little bubble. I am not sure which one signified the correct temperature. He pressed all day, none stop; at his little table. It was amazing to watch him working.

 

I am sure you know all this, but; I thought others would like to read about it.

 

Another thing that used to be done with the hard soap, that people might not know about these days, was to soap the canvas's. When the coat had the final press, it acted like an adhesive, sticking the canvas and material together. (the forerunner of fusible!)

 

Cheers

 

Mansie


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#6 greger

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Posted 02 September 2015 - 02:06 PM

Heard of tailors using soap as a short cut. If not using it as a short cut maybe no problem, but when the soap is eventually gone wouldn't it be- not so nice. It seems customers would stop going to that tailor. Isn't there some vest linen used today that is of the same principle? I wonder how the dyes worked with the soap.

Believe both Poulin and Hostek used donkeys for the final pressing. Neither one of them use many or any of the same methods. Dipping the finger in the bucket of water to flick droplets on the iron seems better to me. A sharp sizzle.
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#7 Lewis Davies

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Posted 06 November 2015 - 05:18 PM

i have one they are well worth it its useful for pressing and working as you go along 


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