Jump to content


Photo

Shirt Draft - Unicut 1975

Shirt Draft Unicut 1974

  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#1 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 19 September 2015 - 10:10 PM

The Shirt

 

http://www.intermode...73-74_klein.pdf

 

From Page 154

 

In a rather classical style, but without a shoulder blade fold, this shirt is quite close to the body; yet it having the necessary ease in the back.

 

The measurements:

 

Chest                     – 50 

Scye Depth           – 23 ½  (scye depth is a calculated measurement: ¼ chest + ¼ waist length (see page 154 of Intermode 1973-1974). it also can be measured from the neck point to a strip of folded paper which is clamped under the arm in the highest possible position and folded horizontally to centre back. (Actual scye depth will be 2cm lower(W....O).)

Waist length:         – 44 ½ (calculation formula: 1/4 height)

Length:                  – 80

Back Width:           – 20 ½ (formula: 1/4 chest + 8cm front)

Chest Width:            20 (formula: 1/2 chest – 5cm)

Neck:                     – 41

Sleeve length       – 60 (outer length of from armhole seam to wrist)

 

Unicut%20Shirt%20Fig%206_zpsxcpyiovp.jpg

 

Fig. 6 Drafts of Back and Front parts

 

A...A1         = 1/6 the Neck + ½ cm (In this case 7 ¼ cm)
A...W         = 1/3 of A...A1

W...O         = Scye Depth + 2 cm (25 ½ cm)

W...T          = Waist length + 2 cm (46 ½ cm)
W...L          = Length (80 cm)
O...O1        = Back Width + 2 cm (22 ½ cm)
A3              = vertical from O1

A3...S        = 1/5 of A3...O1 — 1 cm (4 ½ cm)

A1...A2      = 1 cm (Shoulder line from A2 Across, Passing S)

S...S1         = 2 cm

01...02        = ¼ of the Chest Width (12 ½ cm)

A4               = vertical from O2, 2 cm lower than A3

O2...O3      =  Chest Width + ½ cm (20 ½ cm)

A6...L2       = vertical to O3

A6...C         = same amount as A...A1 (Draw a circle with centre point A6)

A7               = 1 cm beyond the circle line

C1              = ½ cm below the circle line.

 

The entire neck seam (W...A1 + A7...C1) should almost be the Neck width of 41 cm.  At the same time any occurring difference has to be eliminated by adjusting the height of A7.

 

A7...S2        = Same width as A2…S1

O2...S2        = O1   S1 – 2 cm

 

Side Seam: O4 lies 1 cm in front of the middle of O1...O2. Draw a vertical midline; remove 1,5cm at waist depth narrowing into the hem. (I.e.: shape the actual side seam lines, hollowing 1,5cm on both sides at the waistline and tapering to 0cm at the hemline.)

 

Front Edge (overlap) extends 2cm from centre front line.

 

Yoke: the yoke seam is measured down: 3 cm from A7 and S2: 5 cm from S1: 6 cm from W: The shoulder blade dart (A1...A2) is vertical and tapering to the yoke seam, and will be folded/pinched away.

 

Drawing upper right cornerTo form the yoke join the shoulder lines A2..S1 and A7...S2.  The back yoke seam curves out ½ cm between the arm scye and the folded dart line.  Hollow both front yoke seams ½ cm at the first third.

 

Unicut%20Shirt%20Fig%207_zps6gbclqdu.jpg

 

Fig. 7 The sleeve

 

K...P = Centre line: outer sleeve length minus 7 cm cuff width (at P: square out to both sides)

K lies in the middle between S1 and S2 at the armscye of the pattern.

K...m = half height of O4...K of the armscye (square line)

K...U7 rear armhole circumference from S1…O4

K...U6 front armhole circumference from S2…O4

Sleeve Cap: in the rear the upper third curves out 2 cm, in the front lower third a 1 cm hollow.

P...P6 and P...P7: 15 cm each (straight seam lines to U6 and U7)

The Rear Slit lies 6 cm inside P7 and is 10 cm long.

Left and right of the slit are lying with each 2 cm distance and each 2 cm deep folds.  The cuff is 26 cm long and 7 cm wide.

 

Unicut%20Shirt_zpsfima1ut0.jpg

 

Fig. 8 back, front and Yoke (Göller)

 

Not only the contour of the sides seams but also the contour of the yoke seams of the pattern pieces have to match exactly.

 

Fig. 8 to 11: The Collar

 

It can be worked with a separate stand or as a one-piece collar.  In the latter case though there is a condition, that the rear collar width (K2... K4) is ½ cm higher than the collar stand (W...K2)

 

Unicut%20Fig%208_zpskybkzcdm.jpg

 

Fig. 8: the Collar Stand

 

A...C           = half collar width (20 ½ cm)

C...C1         = ½ cm

C...3            = 3 cm

A...W          = 1 ½ cm

W...K2        = 3 ½ cm

C1...C2       = 2 ½ cm, right angle to the line 3...C1

Extension of the collar stand seam C1: 2cm, (it’s the same amount that the front edge extends past the centre front CF)

 

Unicut%20Fig%209_zpsuph1lav4.jpg

 

Fig. 9: The One Piece Collar

 

K2...K4       = 4 cm (= ½ cm more than W...K2)

C5               = ca. 4 cm outside C1

C5...K5      = ca. 10 cm

 

Unicut%20Fig%2010_zpsr2tbaaii.jpg

 

Fig. 10: Preparation for the two piece collar

 

Here K2…K4 is more than ½ cm wider than the collar foot (stand);

Therefore the outer edge of the collar would be too short compared to a one-piece collar.  Parallel to CB, K2...K4, lines are drawn 3 cm apart.

 

Unicut%20Fig%2011_zpsetrnszvr.jpg

 

Fig. 11: Collar with a separate stand

 

After the collar fold line is cut off (line K2...C2), the three lines are slashed to the collar fold line, and opened at the outer edge by about a third each of the missing amount (Total extension: the amount, that K2...K4 is wider than W...K2).

 

With all Cutting Diagrams:
 

Seam Allowances MUST be Added


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 19 September 2015 - 10:55 PM.

  • Schneidergott, Terri, pfaff260 and 5 others like this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#2 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 19 September 2015 - 10:27 PM

This is a cool shirt draft from Switzerland 1974-5

 

It is placed here for private study purposes only.

 

Thanks again to peterle for helping greatly with the translation.

 

If you find any errors or inconsistencies please comment.


  • sewbot likes this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#3 sewbot

sewbot

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 20 September 2015 - 03:10 AM

Thank you Schneiderfrei!
This is a huge help.

#4 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 21 September 2015 - 08:26 AM

Just so as there is no confusion:

 

The Intermode patterns are based on differently stated formulas than Rundschau or other systems.

 

The Chest in the draft is always half the measured value. So, this is for a man with 100 cm Chest = 50 cm on draft.

 

And:

 

UniCut

 

Close Fitting Garments for Men

 

The measurements for size 50:

Chest 50

Waist 45 (Ow – 5 cm)

Scye Depth 23 ½ (¼ Chest + ¼ Waist)

Waist Height 44 ½( ¼ Body Height)

Back Width 20 ½  ( ¼ Chest + 8 cm)

Front Chest 20 ( ½  Chest – 5 cm)

Neck 7 ¾  (1/8 Chest + 1 ½ cm)

 

All measurements except chest and waist will be applied net, without addition (of ease) for the pattern/garment. 


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 21 September 2015 - 09:29 AM.

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#5 Schneidergott

Schneidergott

    Master

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,680 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland

Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:41 AM

All 3 PDF files are easy to download (I recommend the "gross" (means big) version), although it takes a while to load.

Some interesting drafts, as far as I can tell so far.


"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#6 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 23 September 2015 - 08:04 AM

I confess I did not quite understand what the 'small' and 'large' referred to when I first -downloaded them.  

 

I might have to re-post the diagrams so its easier to read the figures.

 

Love the pure 60's and 70's styling and they do seem to be quite innovative in general.


Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#7 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 23 September 2015 - 09:52 AM

In those drafts there are instructions like:

 

fussweite.png

or

 

seatwidth.png

 

Is that a division sign? And if so, what would be 1/2 the bottom measure or 1/10 of the seat width divided by 1 cm?


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#8 Learner

Learner

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 122 posts

Posted 23 September 2015 - 10:00 AM

It's called "commercial minus".  Just means (obviously) minus.



#9 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 23 September 2015 - 10:15 AM

It's called "commercial minus".  Just means (obviously) minus.

 

Blimey...I feel like a right twit. I ought to have been able to work it out. Cheers Learner.


Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#10 Learner

Learner

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 122 posts

Posted 23 September 2015 - 05:41 PM

No Problem.  I meant "obviously" because of the name, rather than it ought to be obvious what it's telling you to do.  If you've never seen it before, it's far from obvious :)



#11 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 24 September 2015 - 10:15 AM

Here are the images above in a better dpi.

 

 

 

Fig%206%20Unicut%20Hemd%20gross_zpsqtwfj

 

Fig%206%20Hemd%20Goeller_zpsvlcd0s8l.jpg

 

Unicut%20Hemd%20Sleeve_zpst1ecawiu.jpg

 

Unicut%20fig%207%20Manschette_zpsvqavqrz

 

Unicut%20Back%20and%20Front_zpsdwsoq1rh.

 

Fig%208%20Unicut_zpsc2n96zjo.jpg

 

Unicut%20fig%209_zpss0ol99rb.jpg

 

 

Unicut%20fig%2010_zpspdad3yf2.jpg

 

 

Unicut%20fig%2011_zpsbcfudhgx.jpg


  • Daniel M likes this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#12 tarcisio

tarcisio

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 16 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sao Paulo, Brazil

Posted 24 September 2015 - 10:47 PM

This yoke is the most different I've ever seen.



#13 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 25 September 2015 - 02:25 PM

Hi tarcisio, it is a very interesting draft, illustrating many different ways of solving fitting problems.

 

Look at the sleeve draft, it is asymmetrical.  There is no pleat under the yoke so the ease is put into those curves on each side.

 

And, there is a pleat in the yoke itself.

 

I haven't made it up as yet.

 

I mostly do the work of the translating when I want to know things for myself, I have no problem posting them here afterwards for all to see.

 

There might still be problems with the draft, there always seems to be some in any draft.  I would love to see someone give it a go too.


Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#14 Terri

Terri

    Pro

  • Super Pro
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,021 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ontario Canada

Posted 26 September 2015 - 02:40 AM

Hi tarcisio, it is a very interesting draft, illustrating many different ways of solving fitting problems.
 
Look at the sleeve draft, it is asymmetrical.  There is no pleat under the yoke so the ease is put into those curves on each side.
 
And, there is a pleat in the yoke itself.
 
I haven't made it up as yet.
 
I mostly do the work of the translating when I want to know things for myself, I have no problem posting them here afterwards for all to see.
 
There might still be problems with the draft, there always seems to be some in any draft.  I would love to see someone give it a go too.


I think what you are seeing on the diagram is not a pleat just an indication of the other half of the yoke which isn't drawn in.
Also there shouldn't be ease in the curves, they are just darts, and body and yoke seams should be equal there.
  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#15 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 26 September 2015 - 03:06 AM

Thank you very much terri,

 

Ah, I guess I might have said Shape rather than ease.

 

It is my impression that in the yoke at A1 - A2 the cloth is pinched to shape the yoke.  Is that not a dart in the formal sense?

 

Also the curves at the back yoke seam I thought were to add cloth, to give ease, where the pleats are on a contemporary shirt.

 

My terminology is likely not on point.


Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#16 tarcisio

tarcisio

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 16 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sao Paulo, Brazil

Posted 26 September 2015 - 05:13 AM

Hi tarcisio, it is a very interesting draft, illustrating many different ways of solving fitting problems.

 

I liked this draft and I'll give it a try.
 
Currently I use an old method I've learned in tailoring school. The sleeve have a different shape, doing a gentle "S".

 

It is my impression that in the yoke at A1 - A2 the cloth is pinched to shape the yoke.  Is that not a dart in the formal sense?

 

When you join the dart in a draft you transfer it to other place.


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#17 Terri

Terri

    Pro

  • Super Pro
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,021 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ontario Canada

Posted 26 September 2015 - 06:18 AM

Yes in paper you would overlap the dart that they indicate, which transfers the value of that dart into the yoke seam, thereby changing the shape of the yoke. In essence the dart value is now horizontal, but now in a seam.

The convex curves in the yoke do give a bit of fabric length over the blade, but do not give you the same result as a pleat in the yoke.

A back pleat is held in place at the yoke seam but gives extra fabric widthwise as it releases over the blade.
That pleat is usually added equally from yoke to hem. (But it can be played with if one wished)
  • tailleuse and Schneiderfrei like this

#18 peterle

peterle

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 248 posts

Posted 26 September 2015 - 10:17 PM

The dart A1-A2 in this pattern is meant to be pinched away in the paper pattern to transfer it in a horizontal position. Then the yoke piece, that is cut off from the front (3cm from S2-A7) gets added along this now straight line A1-S1 to create the final yoke paper pattern piece that will be cut in fabric.

The text doesn´t mention, that the yoke parts will be cut off the front and back pattern pieces.


Edited by peterle, 26 September 2015 - 10:29 PM.

  • Schneiderfrei likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Shirt, Draft, Unicut, 1974

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users