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#1 tailleuse

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Posted 16 November 2015 - 04:46 AM

A custom clothier sent me this article from The New Yorker, which argues that "menswear" as a fashion trend went mainstream around five years ago.  The piece is full of ideas and information, including the fun fact that the actor Antonio Banderas is taking menswear design classes at Central Saint Martins (He wants to reintroduce the cape.).  Here are a couple of excerpts:

 
"These days, although ordinary men still dress in ordinary ways, “menswear”—the Internet-centric, metropolitan, yuppie style—keeps getting riskier. Hardcore menswear enthusiasts have found themselves dressing in costume-like clothes; although they look great in their tweedy sport coats and pocket squares, asymmetrical hoodies and slim-cut jogging pants, and military jackets layered over other, lighter military jackets, they also look like they’re in town for a menswear-themed Comic-Con."
 
...
 
"Looking back, it’s obvious that menswear wasn’t just about fashion. In his new book, “True Style,” the fashion writer G. Bruce Boyer, who has an encyclopedic knowledge of the history of men’s clothing, puts today’s menswear culture in historical perspective. The modern male uniform, Boyer writes, has its roots in the “Great Renunciation” of the nineteenth century, when men “gave up silks and satins, embroidered coats and powdered wigs and silver-buckled shoes in favor of woolen suits simply cut and soberly colored.” That movement “away from gorgeousness and toward simplicity” was political: men were adopting a uniform with “ties to liberal democracy.” (Boyer quotes the fashion historian David Kuchta, who writes that modern men seek to communicate “masculine conceptions of industry and frugality” with their clothes.) Women, the thinking goes, have renounced gorgeousness to a lesser degree, because they can still wear beautiful, aristocratic fabrics, like velvet, without apology; men, by contrast, have been forced to “suppress [their] poetic souls and hide [their] light under a bushel of dreary worsted.”


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Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#2 hutch48

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 06:22 AM

The photo of the young guy definitely looked "New York" but its characteristic of how many of the younger guys dress these days. There is a current trend here in OZ for retro style hats which is good if you have a practical reason to wear a hat, (keep your lid warm in the winter), (stop your brains being fried in the summer) and in the last year I have bought a couple of very good Fedora style hats, one in the Bogart style that is commonly called a "gangster hat" and another that is closer to a trilby to go with a couple of trench coats I have scored.

 

In my generation here in OZ you were classed as lucky if you were born ugly and understated clothing was the norm for guys who did not want to look like they were trying to attract attention to themselves so in my own case, this means for the warm weather which we tend to have plenty of here, its Stubbies, a T shirt and a "cow cockie" Akubra hat, all of which are distinctly out of fashion. Fortunately the ladies tend to have much better taste.


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#3 Henry Hall

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 07:05 AM

I also stumbled upon the Antonio Banderas story recently. It seems he is doing the real deal though, something like a five-year course, rather than just dabbling and having a team of designers behind his name.

 

I don't deny G. Bruce Boyer is knowledgeable, but I read his articles and they are frankly quite boring and unspectacular. He's touted as a guru, a #menswear version of that other alleged guru Alan 'terrible trousers' Flusser. 


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Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

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#4 tailleuse

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Posted 17 November 2015 - 08:42 AM

I also stumbled upon the Antonio Banderas story recently. It seems he is doing the real deal though, something like a five-year course, rather than just dabbling and having a team of designers behind his name.

 

I don't deny G. Bruce Boyer is knowledgeable, but I read his articles and they are frankly quite boring and unspectacular. He's touted as a guru, a #menswear version of that other alleged guru Alan 'terrible trousers' Flusser. 

 

Interesting. I was seeking some suggestions for menswear books and both Boyer and Flusser were recommended.  :)


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: menswear trends, history of menswear, cultural theories of menswear, Central Saint Martins, mens style fora, G. Bruce Boyer, gender roles in clothing

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