Jump to content


Photo

Hollywood Waistband


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 ballmouse

ballmouse

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 03 January 2016 - 12:21 AM

From what I understand, the "Hollywood Waistband" means that the trouser has no waistband, the stiffer material that is located where the waist is.

 

What would are benefits of having the waistband vs. not having it? How analogous is this to fused/unfused shirt collars?


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#2 Terri

Terri

    Pro

  • Super Pro
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,021 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ontario Canada

Posted 03 January 2016 - 12:28 AM

I believe it has a grown on waistband, not a sewn on.
There is still supporting material (interfacing) in the waist band area.
  • tailleuse, jeffrey2117, cperry and 1 other like this

#3 A TAILOR

A TAILOR

    Apprentice

  • Professional
  • PipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:metro chicago

Posted 03 January 2016 - 03:44 AM

Some times called a continues waistband. There is no advantage, its just another style.

Yes there is reenforcement inside the waist area.


Edited by A TAILOR, 03 January 2016 - 03:53 AM.

  • tailleuse, cperry and Schneiderfrei like this

#4 hutch48

hutch48

    Pro

  • Professional
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia
  • Interests:Big snippers, practical garments, computer programming and engineering. New website at signature link.

Posted 03 January 2016 - 05:37 AM

I make a number of thing like track pants and shorts in the summer that use a waistband that is re-enforced with 38mm cotton webbing across the front. The technique is to overlock the webbing to the inside top edge then turn it over and face stitch it from the front. If you are making normal men's trousers with darts and a fly at the front you will need to get the waistline straight enough before you re-enforce it because once this is turned over, overlocked and face stitched down they are very difficult to get apart.


  • tailleuse and Schneiderfrei like this

#5 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 03 January 2016 - 10:50 AM

Is the top edge on plain top trousers face-stitched? Traditionally I don't think it is. It's just folded over and serged or cross-stitched to the canvas.

 

As for the pros/cons of a waistband or not, I think it just matters how you want to wear your trousers.


Edited by Henry Hall, 03 January 2016 - 10:53 AM.

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#6 tailleuse

tailleuse

    Master

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,059 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Tailoring and couture.

Posted 04 January 2016 - 03:54 AM

Is it possible that this waist treatment feels or looks less bulky than trousers with a traditional waistband?


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#7 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 04 January 2016 - 08:31 AM

Neither I'd say. A well-made waistband is not bulky.

 

I looked up 'hollywood waistband' and it seems it refers to plain-top trousers with dropped belt-loops.

 

As in the trousers on the left and centre in this photo: (larger image here)

 

hollwaist.jpg


Edited by Henry Hall, 04 January 2016 - 09:08 AM.

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#8 tailleuse

tailleuse

    Master

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,059 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Tailoring and couture.

Posted 05 January 2016 - 06:06 AM

Neither I'd say. A well-made waistband is not bulky.
 
I looked up 'hollywood waistband' and it seems it refers to plain-top trousers with dropped belt-loops.
 
As in the trousers on the left and centre in this photo: (larger image here)
 
hollwaist.jpg

 
Reminds me of a "paper bag waist", although I've only seen it in women's trousers.  (I tried to edit the code so the image would appear smaller. Maybe I put the info in the wrong place.  It usually works, however.)
 
asos-navy-peg-trousers-in-stripe-with-pa


Edited by tailleuse, 05 January 2016 - 06:10 AM.

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#9 jsrowan

jsrowan

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 05 January 2016 - 04:57 PM

Here is another good image of this waistband finish:

brownpants5.jpg

I have heard that some of these trousers could have as many as eight pleats!


  • tailleuse, Schneiderfrei and SpaceMonkey like this

#10 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 06 January 2016 - 11:59 AM

I personally don't care for it. It looks like like braced trousers with belt loops added as a later modification, which is probably how this started out? 

 

I can quite imagine people didn't plan on ordering an entirely new trousers wardrobe when wearing braces made way for belts. Though I have seen the addition of broad belt loops on braces trousers for work - from the 1940s. That was in an agricultural museum (I do all the exciting places).


  • tailleuse, jeffrey2117, Schneiderfrei and 1 other like this

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#11 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 07 January 2016 - 06:14 AM

These pants are fashion. They have nothing to do with business suits. This idea that men only wear business suits and similar and nothing outlandish is 100% false. The purpose is fun. Something to talk about among ones friends. And, to do something different. Entertainers such as singers, comedians certainly would have worn to jazz up their show clothes. It is part of the social life. It is like when your mommy told you to get out of your school clothes into after school and into play clothes. I don't know why so many people trip over this today that men only wear stanchy clothes and tailors don't make fun clothes. If you look at history tailors made lots of fun clothes, and clothes far more outrageous. There have been many tailors who only made stanchy clothes while others think stanchy clothes are so boring and make many other kinds of clothes.
  • tailleuse, cperry and Schneiderfrei like this

#12 Henry Hall

Henry Hall

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 840 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:De Lage Landen

Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:22 AM

What is 'stanchy'?


  • tailleuse likes this

Each phenomenon which is taken up should be treated with as much thoroughness as possible at that standpoint... One thing at a time and that done well!

 

- Otto Jespersen (How to Teach a Foreign Language).


#13 tailleuse

tailleuse

    Master

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,059 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Tailoring and couture.

Posted 07 January 2016 - 11:02 AM

These pants are fashion. They have nothing to do with business suits. This idea that men only wear business suits and similar and nothing outlandish is 100% false. The purpose is fun. Something to talk about among ones friends. And, to do something different. Entertainers such as singers, comedians certainly would have worn to jazz up their show clothes.

 

Speaking of Hollywood and fun, and lightly pushing gender boundaries, below, at the far right is Jaden Smith, the son of actor Will Smith, in a new campaign for Vuitton that has created some buzz.  I think he looks cute in his skirt.

 

599.jpg?w=620&q=85&auto=format&sharp=10&

 

My problem is with this photo:

 

 

04-jaden-smith-lv.w245.h368.jpg

 

As a native New Yorker, I'm a little uncomfortable because it reminds me of the way certain Orthodox Jewish men dress, with tzitzit (fringe, though not nearly as much) and tefillin (look at the hand, not the head). young-man-tefillin-profile-14969491.jpg

 

I cannot believe it's accidental. These campaigns are engineered to get a rise out of people.

 

I'm reminded of Jean Paul Gaultier's 1990s collection, which clearly was inspired by Hasidic Jews:

 

tumblr_llp9c7Zhz61qfhzivo1_500.jpg

 

 

But when does inspiration become empty appropriation? I don't know.


Edited by tailleuse, 07 January 2016 - 11:03 AM.

  • Schneiderfrei likes this

Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#14 jsrowan

jsrowan

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 07 January 2016 - 07:24 PM

I like the Hollywood waistband, it looks cool. And they would be fun to wear.

#15 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 08 January 2016 - 03:57 PM

What is 'stanchy'?


It could be a boring business suit. For some people it is all business suits. In this case, Business suits are important, but some people take it to far, seriously. There are other people who can explain this word better.
  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#16 hutch48

hutch48

    Pro

  • Professional
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 749 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney Australia
  • Interests:Big snippers, practical garments, computer programming and engineering. New website at signature link.

Posted 13 January 2016 - 09:02 PM

I agree with greger here, tailoring is far more than  3 piece men's business suits, before the advent of mass produced clothing, if you wanted a garment that was well made and fitted correctly, you went to a tailor if you could afford it. This in the past involved many different types of clothing. Explorers in darkest Africa, big game hunters (If you could afford a Holland and Holland double gun you could surely afford a fancy hunting outfit), polo players, military personel, so many categories that it would fill the page. Now in modern times you may do OK with RTW as some of it is very well done but if you want something unusual you go to a professional. I have a good friend who has been a tailor for 40 years and I have seen her make things that were so complex they nearly knocked you over.

 

A good tailor is still a specialist, some make business suits for men, other for women, then there is custom sports ware, climbing pants, cycling pants, bridal ware, specialised industrial ware, rugged outdoor men's ware, the list goes on and on. The real difference with modern adaption is that of still making good quality clothing, things that don't fall apart and that you can reliably wear around the world without having to replace them like some of the really cheap junky stuff. If you want novelty ware, go to a tailor with the experience and you can go oout the door looking like a circus performer.  :yes:


  • tailleuse, cperry, Schneiderfrei and 1 other like this

#17 bluetentacle

bluetentacle

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 20 March 2016 - 02:57 PM

Continuous waistband, sans belt. 

 

Attached File  steed_commission2_iteration1_2015-12-24 13.42.59 1 small.jpg   143.04KB   7 downloads

 

Just a style, but when wearing a short waistcoat a la Fred Astaire, it also serves an important function. The waistcoat can be, say, two inches longer than the trouser waist, just enough to hide the shirt, rather than 3 or 4 inches in order to hide the waistband.


Edited by bluetentacle, 20 March 2016 - 03:37 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users