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Here’s Why High-End Dress Shirts Are Worth $465

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#1 tailleuse

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 07:49 AM

Interesting to see there's a sewing machine brand called "Typical."


Dignity. Always, dignity. (Singin' in the Rain)


#2 Terri

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 09:47 PM

I think it is a good thing for people to see the many steps involved and that really it isn't overpriced when you think about it. Add in property rent, fabric and finding sourcing, ordering, fair wages, benefits, shipping, business taxes....
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#3 SPOOKIETOO

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 11:38 PM

When I was in high school in 1974, a pair of basic American made Levis cost $25. Using an inflation calculator that would be $127.99 in todays dollars.

Third world manufacturing doesn't allow for the worker to be treated and paid as if they are human. "Cheap fashion" has and will continue to destroy so much on this planet.

Articles (and videos) like this one should be required PSA's in all industrialized nations. Unfortunately, only those of us that already understand the difference, are the ones that are taking this information to heart. Even those that could benefit from a custom shirt, and afford one, will continue to purchase their "cheap" imported RTW shirts at the mall as its much more important to make the payments on the $100,000 BMW.

( Sigh.......)
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#4 shirtmaven

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Posted 28 March 2016 - 10:41 PM

It looks like a well made shirt. There is a lot of perceived value built in to that price.
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#5 GUCollection

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Posted 29 March 2016 - 02:26 AM

Great story and well made visual tour. Very impressive!


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#6 SealKing

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 05:26 PM

Interesting to see there's a sewing machine brand called "Typical."

They are a Chinese brand based in Xian, very common on the Chinese market. I believe they were a joint venture with Brother at some point, the design somewhat has the same feel to it.



#7 Dunc

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Posted 06 April 2016 - 09:37 PM

Those machinists must be incredibly skilled to be able to sew up to 5 shirts a day to that quality.



#8 Terri

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 09:07 AM

Yes, but is also the cutting. Everything needs to be incredibly precisely cut so the sewing can go so well. you also get faster with repetition.

#9 SpaceMonkey

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 08:48 AM

Even those that could benefit from a custom shirt, and afford one, will continue to purchase their "cheap" imported RTW shirts at the mall as its much more important to make the payments on the $100,000 BMW.

 

This is the thing I'll never understand - Most people spend a maximum 1 hour in their car every day (if that), but they will take out a bank loan for that car, and spend years paying it off. On the other hand, they spend 9-10 hours every day in their work attire, meeting people and making first impressions, but they generally buy the cheapest outfit that they can find, and don't give it a second thought. It just doesn't make sense.


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#10 Steelmillal

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Posted 13 April 2016 - 06:48 AM

It's marketed Fashion. Image is everything for those who may not know the differences between fit, form, function, and purpose. Next years Bimmer will be 1% different and 5% more money...and the credit-based economy rolls on.. Thankfully, mostly, Style comes to all in time and keeps bespoke quality, even if on niche levels, in demand.
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#11 tailleuse

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Posted 14 April 2016 - 08:32 AM

 

This is the thing I'll never understand - Most people spend a maximum 1 hour in their car every day (if that), but they will take out a bank loan for that car, and spend years paying it off. On the other hand, they spend 9-10 hours every day in their work attire, meeting people and making first impressions, but they generally buy the cheapest outfit that they can find, and don't give it a second thought. It just doesn't make sense.

 

The answer is complicated, but people who live in areas in which driving is required for work usually spend a lot of time in their cars well beyond commuting. They use them for shopping, visiting relatives, etc. and having a pleasant, attractive car is important to them. If you're going to be stuck in traffic, you want a great sound system and comfortable seats.  It's ridiculous, but they also may be judged on the quality of their wheels and the extra money put towards a nice vehicle may be worth it.

 

The loan and tax systems in the U.S. are biased in favor of car ownership. You can get a loan for a car and write off the cost of gasoline for some work trips; you can't secure a loan for clothing or get a tax benefit on it.  The bank doesn't consider garments, even very nice ones, attractive collateral. A repossessed car has value as security should you be unable to make your payments.

 

Finally, many people in car cultures in the U.S. beyond the two coasts don't walk a lot and don't care as much about their image or dressing with imagination or for self-expression.  Obviously, these are generalizations.


Edited by tailleuse, 14 April 2016 - 08:35 AM.

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#12 Dunc

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Posted 19 April 2016 - 08:12 PM

There hasn't been a massive marketing campaign running for the best part of a century trying to convince people that well-made and well-fitted shirts are a status symbol.


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#13 Henry Hall

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Posted 20 April 2016 - 07:22 PM

There hasn't been a massive marketing campaign running for the best part of a century trying to convince people that well-made and well-fitted shirts are a status symbol.

 

I'd say there actually is an inbuilt idea of clothes as status symbols, but it's not always the sort of clothing discussed here. Also, unfortunately, bespoke clothing is considered the preserve of an elite, which in fact it probably is.

 

For the regular person a few £3000 suits are something you can't wear every day and in all situations, whereas a £12000 car for getting around in is something that benefits the entire family. And you can drive around wearing a potato sack if needs be.


Edited by Henry Hall, 20 April 2016 - 07:22 PM.

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#14 jepa

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Posted 25 April 2016 - 11:06 PM

When I was in high school in 1974, a pair of basic American made Levis cost $25. Using an inflation calculator that would be $127.99 in todays dollars.

Third world manufacturing doesn't allow for the worker to be treated and paid as if they are human. "Cheap fashion" has and will continue to destroy so much on this planet.

Articles (and videos) like this one should be required PSA's in all industrialized nations. Unfortunately, only those of us that already understand the difference, are the ones that are taking this information to heart. Even those that could benefit from a custom shirt, and afford one, will continue to purchase their "cheap" imported RTW shirts at the mall as its much more important to make the payments on the $100,000 BMW.

( Sigh.......)

I'm with you 100%.



#15 greger

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 02:52 AM

If I remember correctly 1971 Levis were something like $6.58 more or less depending on how big you were. You paid according to how much cloth you needed. If you were 5'8" you paid less. No fault of your own, but if you were 6'5" the price was certainly a few pennies higher. The power of the demand for fads and some realized they could raise the price many times more and still people would buy, even though it is close to junk. From 71 to 74 is a huge amount of mark up; inflation would play a smidget amount of the price increase. Levis weren't even the fad jeans. Fad jeans were way more by 1974. At least that's the way it was here.
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#16 tailleuse

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Posted 26 April 2016 - 11:06 AM

I'm with you 100%.

 

 

The price of jeans has climbed precipitously. But it should be pointed out that your 1974 high school jeans did not have the shaping of designer jeans (which is what many people wanted and still want). Nor did they have the myriad washes or the softness when new. It used to take months to break in jeans,although some people had their own methods for DIY ageing of the denim. And although I think that selvedge denim is kind of silly, the Japanese have created that niche by setting up special, narrow looms that yield only so much fabric.  They also bought up much the dead stock of jeans after World War II and have meticulously recreated it.  A few weeks ago, I attended an exhibit on denim at the FIT Museum and was fascinated to learn that the Japanese have even reproduced historically accurate World War I jeans. Because of thread shortages, the stitching on the outside was painted on.  They've even reproduced that aspect.


Edited by tailleuse, 28 April 2016 - 03:18 AM.

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