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"crooked" and "straight" cutting styles

Cutting styles

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#1 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 08:11 AM

I'm reading Defects and Remedies in tailor-made garments. In the introduction, the author Phillip Dellafera mentions "crooked" and "straight" styles of cutting. 

 

What does this mean? 

Thanks, Claire


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#2 Terri

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 11:50 AM

Relative positioning of the neck point to the CF line.
More period drafts are more crooked than modern drafts. A more crooked cut usually has a closer fitting armhole and positions more fabric into the neckline, in essence increasing what is essentially a dart at the CF, from the chest line to the gorge. This throws extra fabric into the neckline and then often requires an under lapel dart.
More modern cuts are straighter, the neckpoint being closer to the cf construction line, reducing the hidden "dart" at the CF and opening up the armhole.
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#3 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 07:11 AM

Terri,

Thank you for your response. 

Is the hidden dart under the lapel just associated with a crooked cut or is it larger on a crooked cut?

Do you discuss this on your Blog?

Another reason I don't write about Cutting. 

Many thanks, Claire


Claire Shaeffer

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www.sewfari.org


#4 Terri

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 08:43 AM

the under lapel dart is a way to control the excess fabric in the neckline of a crooked cut, but whether you use it or need one depends a lot on how crooked you are cutting. For instance, late 19th C drafts were cut very crooked. Sometimes a dart is indicated in the draft, othertimes it isn't.
The under lapel dart is often used in double breasted styles as the fronts are drafted over the centre front line and there is always, even in modern straighter cutting in a SB jacket, some semblance of shaping in that the neck point is at a greater distance from the CF line than say a shirt neck point is.
(With shirts, the CF line is dead straight from hem to throat, and a shirt neck point is only the neck width from the CF construction line.)

The under lapel dart and variations of it such as a hammer dart, are useful with certain body shapes such as barrel chests, performing the same function as a bust dart. With body shapes like that you have to get creative sometimes especially if the fabric is hard and won't shrink or shape very well.
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#5 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 23 July 2016 - 01:57 PM

Even in straight cuts, a lapel dart of 1.5 cm helps you to shape the chest and still you need some iron work. The fabric today is light and does not take so much iron work.


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#6 zanzare

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 03:34 AM

The under lapel dart and variations of it such as a hammer dart, are useful with certain body shapes such as barrel chests, performing the same function as a bust dart. With body shapes like that you have to get creative sometimes especially if the fabric is hard and won't shrink or shape very well.


Working for opera productions I know too well what you mean by "get creative". But that is part of the fun as well!




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