Jump to content


Photo

Ironwork for Trousers - Extract from ABC des Schneiderhandwerk

Ironwork Trousers FormbŁgeln ABC Schneiderhandwerk dressur Hose

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 01 November 2016 - 11:27 AM

Das ABC des Schneiderhandwerk

 

Fachzeitung Der Schneidermeister

 

Extract from

 

Heft 2 - Die Einfach Lange Hose

 

Translation Created For Private Study by G Boyce

with invaluable assistance from S Pirkl

-----------

 

The Ironwork for the Long Trousers

 

As the title suggests, one must press a shape into the fabric parts of the trousers, because the seams of the topsides and undersides do not lie in the front or rear crease. If this were the case then you could form the individual parts by cutting.  For the shape of the lower topsides the fabric at the inseam and side seam must be drawn out [stretched] with the iron, to get the crease line hollowed or concave.

 

Abbildung 53

 

Abb%2053_zpsxvsmgp4q.jpg

 

Abb 53 shows, which parts of the topsides, must be stretched for shaping.

 

In Abb. 53 the places that must be stretched with the iron are indicated by the crosshatched chalk lines.  This is the technical sign for when the cloth must be stretched.  If one carefully observes the course of the inseam and side seam in this photograph, then one can see without difficulty that the seam lines show a hollow shape. The hollow, which is initially located in the seam lines, has to be shifted to the centre line by ironwork. 

 

As in Abbildung 54

 

Abb%2054_zps9iyzres9.jpg

 

Abb 54 the iron is moved in the direction indicated by the arrow, and the fabric is stretched in this direction

 

one places the iron slightly below the knee height of the topside, gather the cloth of the hem bottom with the left hand and now moving the iron in the direction of the arrow. Thus the fabric is stretched out at the edge.  Depending on the kind of fabric to hand, one will have more or less difficulty to iron the cloth around.  The harder the fabric, and above all the tighter the twist in the warp threads the more difficult it is to stretch the fabric with the iron.  To make the work easier one must moisten the cloth.  One should, however, also take into account the surface of the cloth.  It is not good to wet the cloth more than is necessary. 

 

In Abbildung 55

 

Abb%2055_zpsio1ebbrr.jpg

 

Abb 55  the shaping is achieved by intensive ironwork

 

we see how the iron is pushed down to the bottom during the ironing process.  In the process of the ironwork one should also take advantage of the bias direction of the cloth. For this purpose grab the fabric at the hem at the crease line and by pressing the iron hard onto the cloth pull the fabric in the desired direction.  It is necessary, to somewhat exaggerate the shape, that you want to reach, since as everyone knows, the cloth is trying to regain its natural shape.  To avoid this effect it is wise to shape the piece more than needed.

 

 

At Abbildungen 54 und 55

 

The ironing is shown on the side facing away from the body.

 

With Abbildungen 56 und 56a

 

Abb%2056_zpsvmicwrnj.jpg

 

Abb 56 One can also iron in the necessary shape at the side facing the body

 

Abb%2056a_zps70zxo5l7.jpg

 

Abb 56a  the left hand guides the iron just as well as the right hand.

 

We show how this work may even be performed on the side facing the body.  Here the left hand guides the iron, while the right hand grasps the cloth under the hem and leads the iron work in the same way, without any difficulties.  It is good for the apprentice to practice the ironwork with the left and the right hand equally, since this will only assist the acquisition of skills for work.

 

Both the fork area and the side seam area have to be treated equally in the ironwork.  After stretching the seam edges of the cloth, one folds the piece together, at the crease line, so that the seam edges are lying on top of each other.  As Abb 56b shows the achieved shape now is to be distributed equally with the iron to the inseam and the outseam

 

Abbildung 56b shows.

 

Abb%2056b_zpsq6npb88b.jpg

 

Abb 56b   In order for both parts to be uniformly processed by the ironwork, the fabric is folded together at the crease.

 

Through a secondary treatment with the iron, both sides (inseam and side seam) are evenly distributed.  This avoids a situation where the side seam is stretched longer than the inseam or vice versa, which could later affect the shape of the trousers.

 

Usually it is easier to form the ironing crease from the wrong side of the fabric so that one can get a good picture of the shaping.  We don’t want to misjudge, but that is not always correct to press the ironing creases sharply from the wrong side, because problems may arise later.  By creasing the fabric in the ironing crease and by the firm ironing from the wrong side the weft fibres in the ironing crease are stretched. When one turns around the trouser parts later so that the right side lies outward, then the ironing creases have to be ironed out in the opposite direction. Thus the fibres at the crease line are being bent in the opposite direction.  Therefore, understanding professionals have long since ceased to iron from the wrong side of the fabric but fold the pieces wrong side together and press the crease line from the right side by using a pressing cloth from the right sides.  (But be careful!  Do not use an iron that is too hot!)  This surely has an influence on the later durability of the crease.

 

While the ironwork of the topsides is usually restricted to the lower parts of the leg, the ironwork of undersides extends all over the piece.  The shape of the seams does not have a straight line. Therefore the seamlines of the undersides must be ironworked in a way that they harmonize/synchronize with the seamlines of the topsides.  Because you can only join equally formed seamlines when you want to achieve the correct shape of the legs.

 

Abbildung 57

 

Abb%2057_zpsnu1joom6.jpg

 

 

Shows the areas of the undersides, that are to be shaped.  The areas marked with cross hatched lines are to be stretched during the ironing process.  And in the areas indicated with curved lines the fabric must be compacted/shrunk [eingebügelt / hineinpressen (from Duden)] at the edge of the cloth. The stretching and shrinking is not only done at the edges but continued towards the crease line of the piece. Because the crease line will not be straight, but will take the shape that is achieved by the ironwork.

 

Abbildung 58

 

Abb%2058_zpsjkztiizu.jpg

 

 

shows first where to place the iron and  how to grasp the fabric in the area of the side seam. Thus, one places the iron at the level of the seat and by pushing the iron and pulling the fabric in the direction of the arrows you stretch the fabric.  By using the bias of the weave, the shaping is much easier to do. When pulling the fabric in the shown direction, a slight length will develop in the side seam in seat level. This has to be shrunk away to achieve the right shape of the pants.

 

Abbildung 59

 

Abb%2059_zpsmng2ueeu.jpg

 

Abb. 58 und 59. diagonal (bias) ironwork of the undersides

 

The first iron stroke was performed in the direction of the arrow to the sideseam.  Now the iron is sitting on the fabric, on the sideseam, at knee height.  The left hand grasps the cloth of the undersides about the level of the calf at the inseam, so that the fabric can be stretched from knee to calf in the direction of the second arrow.  Thus the ironwork process is facilitated as much as possible by the use of the bias fibre direction.  It should be emphasized that during ironwork, the shaping must be carried more intensively than is required, because the fabric always has the tendency to return to its original position.  Therefore the shaping can be exaggerated without disadvantage.

 


Abbildung 60

 

Abb%2060_zpshfs3l9wl.jpg

 

The iron now passes the way from the knee to the calf.  Now the last iron strike passes down from the calf in the direction indicated by the second arrow, to the sideseam.  Here also, the fabric will be easier to stretch because of the bias direction. Between the knee notches and the bottom hem a slight wavy length develops in the area of the sideseam, which must be shortened/shrunk in by careful iron work.

 

After the iron has been passed in the direction of the mentioned path to the bottom hem and the individual parts are brought into the required shape by the intensive ironwork, the ironwork for the side part is, for the moment, finished.  The inseam also gets the same shape that was given to the sideseam.  Here too the iron is first placed at the level of the seat, see

 


Abbildung 61

 

Abb%2061_zpss7qdsorn.jpg

 

and the fabric is stretched in the direction illustrated by the arrow, by working in bias direction during the ironwork process.  The iron strokes end at the knee height.

 

According to Abbildung 62

 

Abb%2062_zpsilggdd4a.jpg

 

turn the iron a bit outwards and stretch the cloth according to the indicated arrow in the direction towards the calf.  At the same time, the left hand grasps the cloth at the level of the calf and pulls it out as the iron is advanced.  The lower part of the inseam side is also stretched in the direction of the arrow lines.  The left hand also pulls the cloth in the bias.  The iron is turned during this part of the process.  Length that develops in the inseam at the level of the calf is to be shortened, see

 


Abbildung 63

 

Abb%2063_zpsvd4cprcw.jpg

 

After both the side seam as well as the inseam are brought to the required shape through intensive ironwork, take the two undersides and turn them over, and redo the work in the same way, once more, from the other side.  Then it is always advisable, when the two fabric layers lie on top of each other, to repeat the ironing process on the back part, so that the underlying part is not adversely affected.  When the work is ended, then separate the two undersides and fold the two individual parts, as it is represented in

 

Abbildung 64

 

Abb%2064_zpsh0ru1xba.jpg

 

the side seam and the inseam lie flush onto each other. Now you should recognise, that the achieved  hollow shape reaches as far as to the crease line. The trouser crease, no longer has a straight shape but now has the form we wanted to achieve with ironwork. After putting the pants together, the inseam and sideseam parts must be smoothed again so that between the inseam and side parts, as far as form moulding is concerned, no difference can be detected. During the entire form shaping operation the iron was moved in the direction of the indicating arrows.  It is possible to flatten out the underside creases with the iron from the wrong sides.  However, it is advisable, to avoid ironing the creases firmly but to iron them quite lightly.   Preferably it is better to fold the pieces wrong side together.  Using a damp pressing cloth you can press the trousers crease flat.   It is very important that the inseam and outseam line up exactly.

 

Abbildung 65

 

Abb%2065_zpshkmnudoj.jpg

 

In order to avoid a twisting of the trouser legs, the topsides and undersides are laid together smoothly on the table as shown in Abb 65, and control marks are installed. These must fit together when the seams are basted, and must not shift also when joining the pieces. Often, the Master will want to check the waistband, knee and hem width after the sideseams are basted.  This work is usually done by the Master. The basting stitches are inserted about 0.5 cm from the edge so they don´t get trapped when sewing. That would make removing them much more difficult.


  • greger, cperry, ChiTownTailor and 1 other like this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#2 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 01 November 2016 - 11:30 AM

I hope the text of the translation is clearly understandable.

 

If any questions arise concerning the meaning or the system described they would make excellent points for further discussion.

 

G


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 01 November 2016 - 11:30 AM.

  • ChiTownTailor likes this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#3 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 01 November 2016 - 04:15 PM

Thank you Schneiderfrie and G Boyce and S Pirkl for the translation. It is easy reading.
  • tailleuse and ChiTownTailor like this

#4 ChiTownTailor

ChiTownTailor

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 129 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Bespoke tailoring, bespoke shoemaking, bespoke shirtmaking, and all that jazz :-)

Posted 05 November 2016 - 08:48 AM

Nicely translated indeed! Thank you!

Edited by ChiTownTailor, 05 November 2016 - 08:49 AM.

-There might be a lot of tweed merchants out there making a bodger, but I'm sure not one of them. I'd rather be kicking my heels than making a pork on the mangle. No crushed beetles to be found here!

#5 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 08 November 2016 - 09:22 PM

I'd love to see a video of this. I think I need to find a London based tailor who'd be willing to help out..


  • tailleuse likes this

#6 Tony Rutherford

Tony Rutherford

    Umsie

  • Super Pro
  • Pip
  • 64 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brighton, UK

Posted 09 November 2016 - 07:54 AM

thanks so much, this is brilliant


  • Schneiderfrei likes this

#7 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 09 November 2016 - 08:09 AM

One question from me - is steam, water or heat more important for shrinking? I.e what exactly does this look like when you're doing it?

#8 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 09 November 2016 - 08:30 AM

Well as you can see from the text there is no discussion at all as to the method of shrinking.  

 

I would certainly like to hear Schneidergott's view on this matter.

 

In general my thought is that shrinking is achieved by a combination of moisture and heat.


  • tailleuse likes this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#9 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 09 November 2016 - 08:47 AM

I guess it may be cloth dependent too. I've just made up some wool/cotton blend which I've struggled to shape (it just doesn't seem to shrink!) and am wondering whether to rip them down and try again or whether to try something else..!
  • tailleuse likes this

#10 greger

greger

    Master

  • Senior Professional
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,122 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington, USA

Posted 11 November 2016 - 04:43 AM

How was the cloth prepared before cutting?

#11 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 11 November 2016 - 06:17 AM

Greger - do you mean was it pre-shrunk or similar? If so no.



#12 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 11 November 2016 - 09:58 AM

I've now understood this (I think!) The shrinking is relative - ie if one element of piece is stretched and the another isn't then as regards the other the untouched piece is shorter or 'shrunk'. It isn't a question of physically making something smaller, just relatively smaller.
  • tailleuse and Schneiderfrei like this

#13 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 11 November 2016 - 09:59 AM

I still don't quite understand how one ensures that the seams aren't distorted though - I've just played around with a leg and now have an inseam which seems to be about an inch longer than the outseam!

Edited by lngn2, 11 November 2016 - 10:00 AM.


#14 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 11 November 2016 - 10:38 AM

Did you fold the piece and do them together?


  • tailleuse likes this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#15 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 11 November 2016 - 06:20 PM

That would have been sensible.

#16 Schneiderfrei

Schneiderfrei

    Pro

  • Senior Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 863 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, Australia
  • Interests:learning and imagination

Posted 11 November 2016 - 06:38 PM

It also in the text   :thumbsup:


Edited by Schneiderfrei, 11 November 2016 - 06:41 PM.

  • tailleuse likes this

Shell made out of gold
Found on a beach picked up and you held so close


#17 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 16 November 2016 - 01:03 AM

At risk of this becoming a thread about my deficiencies I've gone back to one of the undersides I ripped down and have shaped it per the text which gives the below. There seems to be a lot of excess around the seat seam though - have I done something wrong?

Attached Files


Edited by lngn2, 16 November 2016 - 01:04 AM.

  • tailleuse likes this

#18 lngn2

lngn2

    Apprentice

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 138 posts

Posted 16 November 2016 - 01:59 AM

A close-up too

Attached Files







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Ironwork, Trousers, FormbŁgeln, ABC, Schneiderhandwerk, dressur, Hose

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users