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Rupert Lycett-Green in Neo-Edwardian double breasted.


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#1 carpu65

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 06:19 AM

1965.
Rupert Lycett-Green of "Blades" in Neo-Edwardian DB.





#2 carpu65

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 06:23 AM

A real 1901 Edwardian DB with a 1966 Neo-Edwardian.
The Neo-Edwardian style of 60s is much more close to original style that the Neo-Ed of late 40s/early50s.




#3 Sator

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 07:02 AM

The coat in the first post reminds me a lot of this one:



It was from when Edward VII was still the Prince of Wales in the 1890s.

#4 Sator

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 07:11 AM

And here is a reefer styled blazer from Rundschau, 1969:



It looks very Edwardian. This sort of button-three reefer seems to work best when it is cut very clean and lean to emphasis the vertical aspects of the wearer. I think it looks very stylish.

#5 Sator

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 09:41 AM

Did anyone else notice the following quote from Timothy Everest, a disciple of Tommy Nutter:

He describes his look as a "business suit that becomes a cocktail suit": it's an Edwardian look, with three-button coat, hacking jacket pockets with high lapel notches, high armholes, the soft Kilgour shoulders and folded-over cuffs.


From:

http://www.cigarafic...22,1803,00.html

It goes to show that the Edwardian era is still considered a high-water mark in men's style by the British, just as Golden Era Hollywood is considered the peak of style by Americans. The regard for the Edwardian era is clearly something shared by those who prefer more classical style as well as the avant garde such as Nutter.

#6 greger

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 12:40 PM

QUOTE (Sator @ Oct 7 2009, 02:11 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
And here is a reefer styled blazer from Rundschau, 1969:



That is a splendid coat. Some people believe it should not be without imperfections. I don't. In time through wear and tear and drycleaners it will gain plenty of imperfections.

#7 culverwood

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 07:00 PM

QUOTE (carpu65 @ Oct 7 2009, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Is the 60's version a 6x3 or a 6x2.5 either way love it and the blazer/reefer shown.

#8 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 12:39 AM

I've tried not to post on this topic, but I have to. The "Neo-Edwardian DB" at the top does not say Neo-Edwardian, nor does it say to me Edwardian, it looks like a barstard of several different Early Victorian Styles and it is just wrong, looks like what would happen if an 1850's new-market mated with an 1840's DB tailcoat, and add an 1880's high roll to boot. blink.gif just looks odd to me, perhaps I need to lay down the old books for a while.

ok now I'm seeing things... or not... the pic seems to have gone Silly.gif
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#9 Sator

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 12:46 AM

^ Oh, spoilsport - who cares! tease.gif It's not meant for the theatre. Neo-Edwardian is not Edwardian, nor should it be. Even the cutting system is not Edwardian. Nor should it be, since the cutting systems of the 1960s were more advanced anyway poke.gif . It's the lean and clean '60s look with retrospective inspiration. Otherwise, it would just be historical costume. It's the same in every era when a style reiterates. Every time it comes back, it's never a literal repetition.

#10 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 01:01 AM

QUOTE (Sator @ Oct 8 2009, 04:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
^ Oh, spoilsport - who cares! tease.gif It's not meant for the theatre. Neo-Edwardian is not Edwardian, nor should it be. Even the cutting system is not Edwardian. Nor should it be, since the cutting systems of the 1960s were more advanced anyway poke.gif . It's the lean and clean '60s look with retrospective inspiration. Otherwise, it would just be historical costume. It's the same in every era when a style reiterates. Every time it comes back, it's never a literal repetition.


Oi! I don't do theatre aggressive.giftongue.gif

I know, I know, just the aesthetics of it just look off to me, the flat bottom of the front not so gracfully flowing into the skirts. None the less I'm going to let the advanced remark slide friends.gif
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#11 carpu65

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 09:21 AM

A 60s "Neo-Edwardian" Double Breasted today.
This is an Italian Mod with one of his bespoke suits.



#12 Sator

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 01:19 PM

^ I love the lean and clean Neo-Edwardian 1960s look. wub.gif

With the popularity of narrow ties, as well as TV programmes like Mad Men, we are at a similar point in the cycle to that time. I think the '60s were one of the most stylish decades of the 20th century. It was a kind of pivotal point in the century, Janus-faced - at once looking forward and backwards. Cool enough to be Mod, classical enough to be Edwardian.

#13 I.Brackley

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Posted 09 October 2009 - 01:46 PM

shok.gif clapping.gif frantics.gif
I. Love. This coat. A lot.

I've been concerned that a 6x3 DB would only ever look costumey or at best quaint in these modern times. This dispells any such worries. I even love the lapels which again I worried would scream too old-fashioned. Nope. Safe. A beautiful suit.
Thank you for sharing


QUOTE (carpu65 @ Oct 8 2009, 07:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A 60s "Neo-Edwardian" Double Breasted today.

"The possibilities that exist in the portrayal of personality constitute the strongest, and in fact the only unanswerable argument for the supremacy of Custom Tailoring"

-F.T. Croonborg, c. 1917

#14 Sator

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 09:17 PM

And here from the May 1966 edition of Rundschau is a stunning Norfolk suit, complete with a ticket pocket in the left sleeve:



The tailor is Josef Peschek of Graz, Austria and was shown at an exhibition in Vienna.

The next two come from the same exhibition. The first is an overcoat accessorised with gloves and walking stick:



On removing the overcoat you see a beautifully cut button-three reefer:



#15 greger

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 05:27 AM

Is this really a norfolk?

Nice coat with corded piping.

#16 Sator

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 04:11 PM

This one is a yolked Norfolk. Norfolks come in all sorts of cuts, this being one of many possibilities.

#17 Schneidergott

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 04:38 PM

QUOTE (greger @ Oct 10 2009, 09:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Is this really a norfolk?

Nice coat with corded piping.



I'm afraid, there is no piping in this jacket. The photo editors of the Rundschau in those days deliberately added some darker lines to mark the outlines and seams of the coat, which with certain fabrics wouldn't show in the print.
That bold pinstripe suit is a piece of beauty. Pity we cannot see how the sidebody is cut, if there is one at all, since the patch pockets match so well with the pattern.

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.


#18 Schneidergott

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Posted 11 October 2009 - 04:41 PM

QUOTE (carpu65 @ Oct 9 2009, 01:21 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A 60s "Neo-Edwardian" Double Breasted today.
This is an Italian Mod with one of his bespoke suits.



Is it just me, or is this a terribly cut sleeve for a bespoke garment? Or maybe he's a mod ballroom dancer? spiteful.gif

"Nur der ist Meister seiner Kunst, der immer sucht, das Gute zu verbessern und niemals glaubt, das Beste schon zu haben."
"Only he is a master of his art who always seeks to improve the good and never believes to have the best already"

http://www.dressedwell.net/ It's snarky, but fun.





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