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Rupert Lycett-Green in Neo-Edwardian double breasted.


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#19 I.Brackley

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 04:47 AM

QUOTE (Schneidergott @ Oct 11 2009, 01:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Is it just me, or is this a terribly cut sleeve for a bespoke garment? Or maybe he's a mod ballroom dancer? spiteful.gif


My earlier histrionics aside, I did notice the folds in the sleeve, and decided to overlook it so enamoured was I with the body. wub.gif Also I gave the photo the benifit of the doubt: maybe the light is playing tricks or it's some effect of "waterfalls" menioned elsewhere as a regional fetish.

Oh wait! The ballroom dancer quip is on the right track, it's cut so as to sit cleanly when he's riding his moped! thumbsup.png
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#20 greger

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Posted 12 October 2009 - 06:40 AM

I wonder if that coat is fused? He maybe a tailor trying fuse.

#21 carpu65

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 03:01 AM

Other images of the coat.
Material is light mohair.
The suit is new,not vintage.
I think that is cut from a tailor in Milan.






#22 carpu65

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 03:10 AM

Other suit of an Italian Mod.
In Italy the Mods movement is concentrated mainly in Turin and Rome,and is focused on many aspects of early-mid 60s culture:suits,cars,design,movies,music (lounge and soundtrack from 60s movies and tv shows).









#23 carpu65

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 04:38 AM

Another picture.
The Italian Mod Daniele Savarč with his new suit cut by the Meapolitan tailor Domenico Pirozzi.




#24 Sator

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 12:58 AM

I've heard of Pirozzi, and seems to be well regarded. That coat looks very nice actually. It's fascinating to hear about these Italian bespoke trends.

Here are some quite elegant examples of things that Hardy Amies did in the 1960s. This one comes from the January 17, 1969 issue of The Tailor and Cutter:







#25 I.Brackley

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 02:47 AM

QUOTE (Sator @ Oct 13 2009, 09:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The photo is a bit grainy, so it's hard to tell but are the pockets on this "Mao suit" finished without welts?
"The possibilities that exist in the portrayal of personality constitute the strongest, and in fact the only unanswerable argument for the supremacy of Custom Tailoring"

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#26 carpu65

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 04:52 AM

QUOTE
It's fascinating to hear about these Italian bespoke trends.

Currently in Italy,in the "sartoria" (bespoke) world we have two trends:
Tailors and customers that looking at mid 50s-early 60s style (In Italian version,clean but not too slim,see the suit of Pirozzi ),and Tailors and customers that looking at the 30s (moderate drape,double breasted,single breasted with peak lapels).
For exemple here you can see the clean cut ,very 50s, of Gianni Marigliano (Naples)
and the drape 30s style of Mario Caraceni (Milan).





Like you can see under, i ask to my tailor (in Sicily,im from Messina) the classic Italian early 60s clean cut.



#27 greger

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 06:00 AM

QUOTE (I.Brackley @ Oct 13 2009, 09:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The photo is a bit grainy, so it's hard to tell but are the pockets on this "Mao suit" finished without welts?


Welts are a different kind of pocket than jet. It could be a single piped pocket, or the flap is sewn in to the top with the jet, or sewn on the top. I believe the English like to sew the flap in between the jets.

Sometimes flaps are added as thought there are pockets when there really is not any pocket.

#28 I.Brackley

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 07:13 AM

QUOTE (greger @ Oct 13 2009, 03:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Welts are a different kind of pocket than jet. It could be a single piped pocket, or the flap is sewn in to the top with the jet, or sewn on the top. I believe the English like to sew the flap in between the jets.


Bah! Jet, meant to write jet, don't know why I was thinking 'welt' Doh.gif

Aside, does anyone know when these (flaps between the jets) started becoming a standard on jackets?
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#29 greger

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:10 AM

QUOTE (I.Brackley @ Oct 13 2009, 02:13 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
... does anyone know when these (flaps between the jets) started becoming a standard on jackets?


A while back I was wondering that, too.
It is nice that way to tuck them in for the flapless appearnce.

#30 Sator

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 09:59 AM

QUOTE (I.Brackley @ Oct 14 2009, 02:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The photo is a bit grainy, so it's hard to tell but are the pockets on this "Mao suit" finished without welts?


It's not a Mao or Nehru collar but a Gillie collar. It is made up in a blue-green Donegal tweed.

#31 I.Brackley

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 12:20 PM

I'll admit I was being a touch facetious when I said "Mao suit", I *did* note the collar dosen't enclose the throat as the Zhongshan suit's does and it lacks the pair of military tunic style breast pockets but the overal effect is similar, no?

Can you shed some light on the issue of jetted pockets? Or should that be another thread?



Ian.
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#32 greger

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 02:31 PM

QUOTE (I.Brackley @ Oct 13 2009, 06:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Don't know what the difference is between besom, jet and piped?

I believe some taiors say there is some differences.




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