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The New Mitchell System - Sleeve System


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#1 Sator

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 01:26 AM

I have heard some American tailors regard this 1951 text as a classic and many still draft by it. For some reason, the sleeve system has been particularly singled out for praise. It apparently works well - as long as you don't change the armscye! So by request I have scanned it for your perusal:













#2 Old Henry

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 12:39 AM

....

#3 jefferyd

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Posted 30 December 2009 - 12:49 AM

If Old Henry is who I think he is, I am looking forward to his reply to this thread!

I think it should be clarified that ANY sleeve system starts to fall apart if the formula for drafting the scye is modified, but a cutter who knows how to adjust his sleeve according to the scye will have no trouble. There were threads on sleeve adjustments somewhere, which Sator will be kind enough to link to, as I am too lazy.

#4 Old Henry

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 10:25 AM

Also regarding The Mitchell System ;; I cut the side body in a way that I learned from a Grand old English tailor. It is so clever , Adds an English line and shape that cups the hem and side vents ..I must figure how to post it ,,

Edited by Old Henry, 31 December 2009 - 10:30 AM.


#5 Sator

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 10:32 AM

For those interested here is what A.A. Whife has to say about "barreling" (or cupping of the skirt as Old Henry calls it):

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=115

There is also a separate thread on cutting lounge coats by the New Mitchell System:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=546

#6 Sator

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Posted 31 December 2009 - 10:37 AM

There were threads on sleeve adjustments somewhere, which Sator will be kind enough to link to, as I am too lazy.


I think you might have been thinking of this thread:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=483

There is also this one probably also by Whife:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=653

#7 pomy

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 05:54 AM

Dear Sator,
What the author has in mind Arm Scye? How to measure this value, the drawing or a man?
www.gbtailors.blogspot.com

#8 Sator

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 06:01 AM

Whenever you draft a sleeve it is to fit onto the armscye circumference of the coat you drafting for.

#9 pomy

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 06:15 AM

Thank you.
I have more questions about the book. As I understand Armscye be measured on the drawing coat, less allowances? Which parts of the picture sleeves are allowances?
www.gbtailors.blogspot.com

#10 Sator

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 06:27 AM

If you don't where the seam allowance of a sleeve is, I would suggest that it might perhaps be best to get a bit of experience sewing coats first before drafting them. It is usual that an apprentice not be allowed to learn to draft until they can make up a coat from start to finish.

#11 greger

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 08:36 AM

When drafting a pattern it should tell you tell you at the beginning what the seam allowances are and if there are none included in certain parts. Using a store bought patterns I think is waste of time. If you have no experiance in making patterns, then after drawing the pattern cut a muslim first to check the fit. You must remember that even if you draw the pattern right that it may not fit perfect, which is what inlays are for. From person to person human shapes can be very different, even with the same measurements. Store bought can have more problems than the ones you make, like deep armholes. Some pattern systems are better for this body type or that one, but not every body type. Fittings are very important, as are the inlays for them. Sometimes in fittings the opposite of what you think is right; for example, the armhole maybe to tight in the front, but if you cut away the front of armhole you made the coat/shirt/vest smaller. Opposite would be changing behind the armhole. Another angle would be to change the shoulder using inlays or an iron.
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#12 Sator

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 09:44 PM

If you meant to ask if seams are allowed for rather than where the seams are, then for the New Mitchell System, 1/4" seams are allowed for.




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