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The New Mitchell System - Lounge Coat System


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#1 Sator

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 01:51 AM

Many American tailor recall how their first foray into the world of garment cutting started with the New Mitchell System. The system remains popular amongst some American tailors. The system was published by Men's Modes, a tailoring journal of which Frank Doblin was the chief technical editor.

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The most interesting feature of the system is the routine use of a Donlon wedge for all proportionate patterns as a way of clipping the front edge, but also to reduce distortion from waist suppression. Another feature of the system is the importance placed on the so-called "free zone", the manipulation of which allows the expansion of the chest and the addition of drape to a cut, interestingly while avoiding advancing the neckpoint. Those raised on British terminology should note that the "strap" is American English for the front shoulder. The term "sack coat" here is just the traditional American cutter's term for a lounge coat in British English, and does not per se imply any particular style of cut.

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The sleeve draft for the New Mitchell system can be found in this thread.

The accompanying collar draft can be found in this thread.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#2 Sator

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 02:02 AM

Numerous examples are given of coats with varying degrees of chest emphasis from nothing, 1/4", 3/4" through to 1 1/4".

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I must say that I'm not quite sure what a "roller sack" is. I have assumed it has to do with the rolls of excess drape in the chest and back, but I'm not certain.

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#3 Sator

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 02:13 AM

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Doblin does use the term "drape" but only in the context of a corpulent cut:

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This adds credence to the idea that the drape cut was originally a corpulent cut. By cutting the chest bigger, it made it look more proportionate relative to the waist.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#4 Sator

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 11:02 PM

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Here is the previously requested draft for a corpulent cut:

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A cut for a stout (though not quite corpulent) figure:

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#5 Sator

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 11:05 PM

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#6 Sator

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 12:20 AM

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Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#7 Sator

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 09:33 PM

...
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#8 Terri

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 02:04 AM

I have this book, but have not used it much- I do remember thinking there were some typographical errors that perhaps did not get caught before printing.

#9 Sator

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 10:01 AM

Thread has been updated to include the sections on How to Measure, and Designing Based on Anatomy.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#10 Kevin Koch

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 02:03 PM

I have this book, but have not used it much- I do remember thinking there were some typographical errors that perhaps did not get caught before printing.

This is the system I currently use and, yes, it is full of errors. But worth working them out.
I had played with it some back in the 80's, but with "Old Henry's" encouragement, I have put it into my routine this time around.

I also found a retired tailor locally that successfully made no less than a few thousand clerical sack and clerical frock coats with this system.
I am experimenting with those drafts currently (when I have time!)
Kevin A. Koch
Koch House of Design

#11 Sator

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 12:37 PM

Topic updated. The sack coat section is almost complete now. Eventually, I will put the entire book up.

I have decided to pin this thread so that we have examples of classic Continental, British and American cutting systems pinned for the purpose of study and comparison. This is the only reason for pinning this thread. Please don't read any more into it this decision that that. It is not because I am an evangelist for this - or any other - cutting system pinned here.

Just as a reminder:

The sleeve draft for the New Mitchell system can be found in this thread.



The accompanying collar draft can be found in this thread.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"




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