Jump to content


Photo

Matching lapel facings on DBsQs for the pros


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Chow Chow

Chow Chow

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC, Johannesburg SA

Posted 29 October 2009 - 08:26 PM

This is a follow-up from an amateur to the topic discussed in the professional forum.

I have seen belly put into a striped DB lapel four ways: (1) purely through ironing with stripes parallel to the edge for the full length; (2) cutting parallel to the stripe but with cutting used to add belly at the bottom, so that stripes are not parallel to the edge towards the bottom; (3) parallel to the stripe but with some cutting used at the top making the stripes there not parallel to the edge (adding more of an upward angle to the lapel at the top); and (4) a bit of 2 and 3 combined.

Is only 1 acceptable? If a lot of belly is required to give the lapels the desired degree of upward angle, arent there limits to the amount of curve/belly that can be achieved purely by ironing? Even if a lot of curve can be achieved solely with ironing, wouldnt a great deal of curve look odd as opposed to some cutting leaving parts of the stripe at the top or bottom not strictly parallel with the lapel edge?

#2 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 29 October 2009 - 08:47 PM

You can be surprised how much ironwork a good cloth can take. I don't see why manipulation of the cloth would make it look "odd". In fact, compared to the amount of manipulation that old fashioned cut on DB lapels took, it is very little indeed.

#3 Chow Chow

Chow Chow

    Umsie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington DC, Johannesburg SA

Posted 29 October 2009 - 09:01 PM

My hypothesis was that diagonal lines that are straight, or nearly straight, look more appealing than lines that curve up markedly. It would then follow that a deviation from keeping the lapel edge strictly parallel is balancing the desire to keep the stripes and the edge parallel with an aesthetic preference for a straight diagonal line.

#4 Sator

Sator

    Administrator

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,998 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 29 October 2009 - 09:55 PM

The chest itself is not a straight line anyway. There are no parts of coats that are finished with a perfectly straight edge.

#5 jefferyd

jefferyd

    Guru

  • Super Pro
  • PipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 October 2009 - 11:59 PM

My hypothesis was that diagonal lines that are straight, or nearly straight, look more appealing than lines that curve up markedly. It would then follow that a deviation from keeping the lapel edge strictly parallel is balancing the desire to keep the stripes and the edge parallel with an aesthetic preference for a straight diagonal line.


That's the whole point. Sort of.

If the lapel were cut in a straight line, the shape of the chest would actually make it look a little hollow and anemic; by cutting the lapel with some belly, as it curves over the chest, it looks more straight. Shaping the facing edge into a curve so the lines do not cut off fools the eye into thinking the lapel edge is much more straight than it actually is- lines cutting off would attract attention, as they do in the example cited in the other thread. I have never come across a cloth that could not be worked into the required shape, and I am accustomed to using the most flimsy of Italian cloth.

#6 Martin Stall

Martin Stall

    Wizard

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 979 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain

Posted 20 February 2010 - 10:32 PM

and I am accustomed to using the most flimsy of Italian cloth.


Ouch. I sympathise.
Sure, I believe your work rocks, but... have you considered, how are you going to sell that stuff?

http: under construction...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users