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A Bibliography for Women's Tailored Garments


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#1 Sator

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 12:45 AM

Many excellent women's tailoring texts date from after the 1940s, in stark contrast to classical men's tailoring which enters into a slow death spiral.

Shaeffer, Claire. Couture Sewing. Taunton Press, Conneticut, 1993

Although a dressmaking text, it is included here for the interesting section on women’s tailored garments

Cabrera, Roberto and Flaherty-Meyers, Patricia: Classic Tailoring Techniques. A Construction Guide for Women's Wear. Fairchild Publications, New York, 1984

The women’s counterpart to Cabrera’s text on men’s tailoring.

Heath, Samuel. Coat and Skirt Making: Skirts, Trousers, Jackets, Coats. Granada Publishing, 6th Edition, London, 1981


A very good text covering the basics of cutting and making up of women’s tailored garments.

Ledbetter, Marie and Lansing, Linda Thiel. Tailoring, Traditional and Contemporary Techniques. Reston Publishing Company, Inc. Virginia, 1981.

A sound book covering the foundations of cutting and making up.

Margolis, Adele. The Complete Book of Tailoring. Doubleday & Company, Inc., New York, 1978

This seems to be regarded as something of a classic for home sewers. It gives clear instructions on coat making from the ground up. It runs to 462 pages in the 1978 edition.

Basic Tailoring. Time-Life Books, New York, 1974

This extremely well illustrated 208 page book can be purchased second hand very inexpensively, as copies seemed to abound. It gives an excellent account of the basis process of fitting and making up a lounge coat and trousers. This makes it a good first choice for anyone on a budget, but can also be recommended irrespective of price.

Moulton, Bertha. Garment-Cutting and Tailoring for Students. B.T. Batsford Ltd, London, 1967

Worthy of note for the range of garments it covers in the cutting section such as raglans, jodhpurs, riding breeches, hacking jackets, capes, hooded capes and panel coats.

Bane, Allyne. Tailoring. McGraw-Hill Company Inc., New York, 1958

Another sound text covering the basics of cutting and making up of women’s lounge jackets and tailored skirts

Poulin, Clarence: Tailoring Suits the Professional Way. Chas. A. Bennett Co. Inc. Publishers. Illinois, 1952

A quite compact American text whose strengths are the highly informative discussions on the fitting and making up of lounge coats and tailored skirts.

Morris, F.R. Ladies’ Garment Cutting and Making. The New Era Publishing Co. Ltd., London, circa 1940’s-50

This is one of the really classic texts for ladies’ garment cutting. It is a huge book running to 471 pages in the third edition. Part of the book is devoted to dressmaking but a substantial proportion of the book is dedicated to women’s tailoring. The entire book has been posted on the internet here:

http://www.vintagese...m-toc-long.html

Whife, Archibald. A (ed.): The Modern Tailor, Outfitter and Clothier. Fourth Edition. Vol I-III. The Caxton Publishing Company, Ltd. London, 1949

Arguably the most important English language textbook on cutting and tailoring published during the 20th century. The general editor of earlier edition was A.S. Bridgeland for the 1928, 1933 and 1936 editions. A 5th edition was published with A.A. Whife as its chief editor.

Holding, Thomas Hiram. The Direct System of Ladies’ Cutting. Originally published London, 1897. Reproduced by RL Shep, 1997.


No historical bibliography would be complete without Holding. It was around this time that women increasingly started to go to their men folk’s tailors. Holding notes that women preferred garments with masculine names and disliked any tailored garment that was too feminine.

#2 jefferyd

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 12:06 AM

Something that has me salivating is Claire Shaeffer & David Page Coffin's collaboration on Chanel called Behind the Seams- The Schaeffer Collection. Previews at http://myvirtualworkshop.blogspot.com

I am not alone in loving to look inside well-made garments and I can't wait to have a look at this!


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#3 Sator

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 12:15 AM

Mmmm...nothing like a good dissection! Skull.gif

#4 tailoress

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 05:59 AM

Hee! I think I have all of these, except the Poulin, which I had but gave away because it was mostly menswear. I can't help myself when it comes to books... By the way, it's Allyne Bane, not Alan, and I believe he's a she!
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#5 Sator

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 10:13 AM

Thanks for alerting me to the typo. I have fixed it up.

#6 posaune

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 07:54 PM

There is a new german book about patternmaking for ladies.

Bekleidung. Schnittkonstruktions für Damenmode
Bd. 1 Grundlagen
Author: Guido Hofenbitzer
Verlag: Europa Lehrmittel
Euro 48,--

It is based on the basic drafts from Mueller and from Optikon. So - no new system but less complicated. There are many examples in it and how to cut linings and facings. The sleeves chapter is a bit short but it is vol. 1.
I think it is very well done and very good for beginners and autodidacts. And the price is good
Lg
posaune
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#7 posaune

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 05:23 PM

Another nice book about sewing a jacket:
Thomas von Nordheim
Vintage Couture Tailoring
http://www.amazon.co...m/dp/1847973736
It is a pity that the print is in gray and in 8 p letters
lg posaune
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#8 posaune

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 08:22 PM

There is a very well written article from Jeffery Diduch in the journal: Threads # 167 July 2013
Title: The sleeve cap seam and the armsyce. He examines first the armhole and the sleeve-cap seams thoroughly, shows how to alter the armhole for a bigger bustdart, a smaller or a lower armhole, and how to correct the sleeve cap for this alteration, and last how to stay the armhole.
This article is a keeper.
lg
posaune
here is his work sheet
http://images.taunto...e_Worksheet.pdf

Edited by posaune, 10 May 2013 - 05:07 PM.

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#9 posaune

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 04:47 PM

Found in the internet:
Interesting page from a dutch tailor teaching pattern making

http://www.projekt67...patroontekenen/
lg
posaune
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#10 posaune

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:08 AM

A new book from Mr. Hofenbitzer is published. It is part II of "Bekleidung. Schnittkonstruktions für Damenmode"

Title: Maßschnitte und Passform

The book is aimed at custom tailors, fashion students and serious amateurs. Systematic Figure analysis is taught and the implementation into the pattern.
http://www.europa-lehrmittel.de/62383
there is also a (long) video on creating a dummy. Text and Pics you'll find in the book too .

Lg

posaune


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#11 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 11:43 PM

2 items--the Moulton book has a very good section on making up. The welt pocket instructions are couture, not bespoke; there's no machine stitching. Is there interest in discussing the differences?

 

My book Couture Sewing Techniques was Revised in 2011. It's much easier to read with numbered steps but there is still a sparsity of diagrams. 


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Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#12 greger

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 08:00 AM

The welt pocket instructions are couture, not bespoke; there's no machine stitching. Is there interest in discussing the differences?

 

Yes I'm interested. It sounds interesting.


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#13 posaune

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Posted 12 July 2014 - 06:32 PM

me too

lg

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#14 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 07:41 AM

In my book, I wrote the directions for an angled chest pocket. I think I can do a condensed version without diagrams here with a rectangle. If not, I'll go to plan B

.

1 Everything is thread-traced at the outset. The welt is cut with 3/8 in. seam allowances at the ends and the bottom of the welt. There is a foldline at the top of the welt, the back (welt facing) is self-fabric with a 1" seam allowance below it. The ends are thread-traced, the foldline, the stitching line at the bottom of the welt, and the "stitching line" at the bottom of the facing. 

 

For a 1 1/4 in. sample, the top to bottom length is 2.5 in. plus a 3/8 in. sa. (seam allow) and a 1 in sa.

 

The interfacing is the finished size of the welt--actually a tiny bit smaller so the welt won't be bigger than planned when you wrap the cloth around the interfacing.

 

2. Baste the interfacing on the ws of the welt. Fold the seam allowances at the ends to the ws, baste. If the welt has a slant, make a small clip at the fold so the sa will lie flat. I make the sa slightly wider on the welt facing so the ends are is not even with the welt ends. 

 

3. Use catchstitches to sew the sa. to the interfacing and ws of the welt facing.

 

4. RST (right sides together) baste the welt stitching line to the lower marked line on the jacket. Baste the under pocket to the top line. Stitch and knot the threads at the ends. No backtacking --if it's too long it's easy to correct. If it's too short, thread a hand-sewing needle and take a stitch or two. 

 

Now there are 2 parallel lines. Now is the time to check before cutting the opening to be sure the welt will cover the opening.  It's a little cumbersome, but you can fold the welt up to be sure that the stitching line at the top doesn't show at the end nearer the center.

 

Cut the opening an clip to the corners of the welt. Since the ends of the welt are finished where to clip is obvious. Hold the underpocket out of the way to clip to the corners at the top of the opening.

 

Push the welt and underpocket through the opening. Smooth the welt and its facing and sew the ends together. I use a fell stitch which you make call a side stitch. It's actually on the underside of the welt so you can't see it.

 

Sew the welt ends to the jacket--I do this from the wrong side of the jacket with cross stitches so the welt "floats" and isn't nailed down. Or  i use blind-hemming stitches.

 

To finish hand-sew the upper pocket to the 1 in. sa on the welt and stitch around the pocket sacks.

 

It takes longer to write than to do it. 

 

I use similar techniques on corners, waistband ends etc. where they are going to covered with lining. 


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Claire Shaeffer

Author, Couture Sewing Techniques

claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

www.sewfari.org


#15 greger

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 12:53 PM

Is this similar to Poulins?

 

Instead of back stitching I was told to tie a reef knot (square knot) and then a tailors not or over hand knot. (Years later I read it in Rhineharts book.) Back stitching makes for a clumsy ending.

 

I don't see what the advantage of a facing is. Some tailors use them. It seems like extra bulk, so less sleek.

 

You push the welt to the underside and then sew the ends to coat? Pipes get pushed under and then sewn, but welts?

 

I should look at your books. Been thinking about buying one or more, not sure how many you have.



#16 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 02:00 PM

I don't think this is in Poulin, but I'll check. I found it on an YSL jacket. 

 

The welt ends are finished on the outside of the coat. 

What are pipes? and are you describing the underpocket with a facing? I use a self-fabric underpocket. The only facing is the back side of the welt and it's pretty important. 

 

At last count, I've written 20 books--some long, some short. 

 

I like your knots. I'm not sure that I have Rhinehart's book. What is the title?

 

Thanks

 

Another thought about the handkerchief pocket--do you use pocketing for this pocket on menswear? If so, that's overkill, the only thing you put in it is a handkerchief or silk square.

 

I might add that women's pockets on jackets should have a lighter fabric than pocketing. They really should be design details and not designed for carrying bulky or heavy items. 


Edited by Claire Shaeffer, 22 July 2014 - 02:05 PM.

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claire.shaeffer@gmail.com

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#17 greger

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 08:46 AM

Here is a link to her book that is on line (and downloadable).

 

Jane Rhinehart -  http://www.mediafire...bii7icy8a9f7zib

 

I got some Silesia from one place that is really thin and would work perfect in womens garments, but some of that stuff is rather thick.

 

Do you include the interfacing in the seam at the bottom seam? It adds strength, but sometimes it seems like it would be nice not to have it. Holland would be good for interfacing but it is best to pin it than baste it into place. What kind of interfacing do you use?

 

Pipes are Jets or Besom. Jets are narrow and besoms are wider. Some people call these piped pockets welts, but, there not.

 

Some of your books are at the library and can only be gotten by placing on hold- a waiting line to see them.


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#18 Claire Shaeffer

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 04:56 AM

Sorry to be so slow in responding but I'm in and out this summer. 

 

I have the Rhinehart book, but it didn't register since it's for menswear. 

 

For the welt pocket, I do not sew it into the seamline at the bottom. I use catchstitches to hold it in place if it won't be topstitched. 

 

I haven't used Holland in a long time because it isn't readily available for home-sewers and they are my target audience. 

Claire 


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Claire Shaeffer

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