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Cutting Skirts


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#1 Sator

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 12:23 PM

Here are the instructions for cutting a skirt starting with a basic sloper from which subsequent styles are derived. I have also included the instructions for deriving a classical tailored skirt from the sloper. There are many other patterns in this classic (but also rare) book from 1942, many of which are more dressmaker's skirts than tailored skirts. As always, the most important aspect of garment cutting is the finding the correct balance, and this Pepin explains particularly well. The inexperienced fitter will look at altering this, that or the other local detail to improve the fit, but the experienced cutter will look first at the Big Picture and the overall balance. Once the Big Picture is taken care of the minor, local details of fit start to take care of themselves.























#2 Els

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 08:46 AM

I draft my patterns using the German Rundschau system and use balance measurements too. I have a handy measurements tape with a piece of led for this purpose.This tape is made by Hoeschst mass.No need to kneel down in front of the client

I measure C.F, C.B and C left and C right lengths with the led piece standing on the floor and measure the distance from the floor towards the waist ( the client has a piece of elastic around the waist)

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#3 jcsprowls

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 11:00 AM

I just use a 72" straight ruler to measure ankle height, knee height, waist height, cervicale height and total height, then subtract as needed.

For crutch depth, I'm a little indelicate. But, I'm also extremely successful with pants. What I do is slide the L-square through the legs, ask the model/customer to adjust so the short arm is at a comfortable height, adjust the square so it's perpendicular to the floor, then take the measurement at the BK waist. Take care to remember to subtract the width of the arm, else you overstate the crutch depth.

I also mentally take note of the trunk width (drill imaginary line into navel and thru to spine) by glancing the number directly beneath the belly on the short arm of the square. If I doubt myself, I'll grab the 18" C-Thru ruler and "scootch" it up against the fullest part of the abdomen so it intersects a value on the short arm, again, subtracting the width of the long arm.

I've never been a fan of proportional measurement when it comes to locating the trunk divisions along the hipline in the draft. It only seems to hold true for the proportionate body.

A couple other areas I use the L-square directly on the model/customer is the underarm inseam and to check the depth/angle of the shoulders along the spine. When I locate shoulder points on base/close-fitting garments, I set the ends of the arms on the shoulder points and then measure down the spine from C7 (i.e. the cervicale).
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#4 Sator

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Posted 02 May 2009 - 01:12 AM

I have just realised that I forgot something really basic. Beginners need to know that if you follow Pepin, you will need to add in a 3/8" (1 cm) seam allowance along with inlays (about 0.5-1"), sometimes called a fitting allowance, to your completed pattern. You also need to determine the prefered finished length before you start. This obviously changes to fashion. If followers of hemline economic theory are to be believed Pepin's length should be "in" again Big Grin.gif

#5 Sator

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 12:47 AM

It should also be said that all beginners should make a test garment to see how their pattern has turned out. This is preferably done using cloth of a similar weight to the one that will be used for the final garment. Muslin is the traditional cloth used for test garments.

Here is some guidance from Poulin on fitting the skirt:









#6 Sator

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Posted 20 June 2009 - 07:28 PM

For an alternative basic cutting method see here:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=178




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