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Rundschau January 1955


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#1 Sator

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 10:10 PM

Hard on the heels of the October 1956 issue comes the January 1955 issue. Once again it has no patterns but it is full of classic photos and illustrations.

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#2 Der Zuschneider

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 11:11 AM

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Those dresses are called 'Mantelkleid'. Big fashion at that time. Could come back, looks very nice.

Edited by Der Zuschneider, 23 December 2009 - 11:13 AM.

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#3 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 11:38 AM

I think the English is "coat dress".

#4 Hanna

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 08:38 PM

Coincidentally enough, I'm starting on a 'coat dress' - or shirt dress as I call them - later today. Pattern from 1954, fabric is a lightweight ivory herringbone wool.

#5 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:06 PM

Ah yes, I should have said "shirt dress". Thanks for correcting me. Goes to show how much I know about dressmaking :blush:

#6 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:22 PM

A study in the H-line silhouette:

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The last evening dress carries a catalogue number of D 6105 for those of you who wanting to have a go at ordering patterns from the Rundschau archives (don't ask me how to do this though - I've got no idea).

#7 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:25 PM

A tribute in memoriam Jacques Fath

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#8 Hanna

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 09:59 PM

I might just try ordering the pattern - curious to see if I can.
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#9 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 10:02 PM

This is their internet contact page:

http://www.muellerso...ent/contact,22/

Rundschau Verlag
Otto G. Königer GmbH & Co. KG
Ohmstr. 15
80802 Munich
Germany

Phone +49 / 89 / 38 16 05 - 0
Fax +49 / 89 / 38 16 05 - 14
Email: info@muellsohn.com

Good luck. Nothing ventured nothing gained.

#10 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 10:54 PM

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#11 Hanna

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 10:59 PM

Ohhhh.... pretty.

#12 Sator

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Posted 23 December 2009 - 11:03 PM

To say I'm only half way through this issue - and I've been scanning like crazy. :wacko:

#13 Sator

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 01:34 PM

D 10066:

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D 10068:

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#14 Sator

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 03:54 PM

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#15 Sator

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 04:18 PM

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#16 Sator

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Posted 24 December 2009 - 07:13 PM

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The last page was the back cover.

#17 greger

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 12:00 PM

When looking at the history of clothes it seems when they run out of ideas for a style or fashion, then something new begins. There are the hanger ons who moan and groan when something new comes and the old disappears. Since raiment is an art, and not just a covering, with a few rules of what to wear where, that means you can't copy somebodies art. You can't paint the Mona Lisa and put your name on it. Your not suppose to paint it anyway. Nor can we take Beethoven's 5th symphony and copy and put our name on that. There are rules to art. A clothes maker and a tailor can be two different things. Real tailors are real artist- they have to follow the rules of art. Therefore, if you use somebody elses pattern system, for example, you are not a real tailor. Beginners are excused because they don't have enough knowledge. Otherwise, pattern system are use for introducing new themes or instruction. You make your own system to meet the new needs of the day, or adapt an old one.

Back to womens clothing. What will be next after the pants style becomes old? Been throught the skirts and the dresss. When in middle school and elementary school girls were forbidden to werar leggings, except leatards. Nowadays, when does a girl ever wear a dress or skirt? What will be next around the corner when we get there? Maybe I should say, will I be looking up from the grave to see what the pretty girls are wearing that is new? That might be how long it takes for something new to come around.
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#18 Sator

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Posted 25 December 2009 - 09:53 PM

The most radically modernist artists of last century such as Kandinsky and Picasso tirelessly studied the works of older masters whom they felt inspired by and deeply indebted to. The father of atonal music, Arnold Schoenberg listed Bach and Mozart as him main influences. The post-war avant garde Italian composer, Luigi Nono also listed Beethoven and the older Italian masters as heavy influences. The point is that having a thorough awareness of what others have done before does not necessarily indicate a regressive mentality or sentimentality towards the past. In fact, it can - and should - mean precisely the opposite. Likewise you see contemporary dressmakers showing off Empire line dresses all the time, without them lapsing into period costume trying to look like Empress Josephine. When using historical influences in the arts (the apparel arts included), it makes it doubly important to try to present them in a fresh light, so that they attain contemporary relevance.

The following shows the original by Velasquez side by side with the modern interpretation by Picasso:

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Nobody can accuse Picasso of a sentimentalist view of the past, and both he and Velasquez are regarded as Spanish masters.

The presentation of period costume as fashionable dress is like trying to pass off Beethoven's Fifth Symphony or da Vinci's Mona Lisa as one's own work. It represents abject failure. Steam Punk and Teddy Boy's styles are also failures in that they are like the disco version of the Beethoven Fifth or the Mona Lisa with a moustache presented as "original art".




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