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The Tailor & Cutter Standard Tunic Shirt


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#1 Sator

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 06:00 PM

Chaudhry was the Chief Pattern Designer at the Tailor & Cutter when this was published in the 1970s. The previous owner has signed the book "5/10/78", so it comes from right towards the end before the T&C ceased publication. It comes from a book called Designing and Cutting Modern Leisure and Cotton Garments for Men. It's not often that you find published patterns for shirts so this is highly welcome.

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#2 Sator

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 06:18 PM

Hard on the heels of the last draft comes another shirt draft from Chaudhry. This one has a publication dates for once, and was published by T&C in 1970. The book is entitled Advanced Practical Designing for Men's Clothing.

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#3 jcsprowls

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 09:19 AM

I've executed this draft several times. It's loaded with errors. Foremost is the neckline formula, which we just covered, elsewhere, today.

I don't agree with the location of #14, the shape of the armhole, the shaping in the sleeve underarm nor the formulas for the collar stand.

On top of it, the draft doesn't match the model picture. So, I'm going to be nice and call it an editorial mistake.
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#4 Sator

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 09:28 AM

^ Are you talking about the tunic shirt or the slimline shirt - or perhaps both? I've only just obtained the book, and have never tried the drafts in them.

#5 jcsprowls

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 11:24 AM

^ the tunic draft fits better than the slimiline; but, it still requires a lot of corrections.

With the tunic, the sleeve draft doesn't have a tall enough or shapely enough cap to complement the body draft. The sceye of the body seems to fit better by default, but the side seam location could bear some improvement. The collar draft is OK; but, I'd suggest using one from a proven style, instead. This band does not follow the conical shape of the neck - it's pretty flat.

The slimline shirt requires even more fitting/tweaking.

This specific book was written to demonstrate that T&C systems could be adapted for the emerging fashions of the era. I believe - and this is only my opinion - that it was written with the speed "quality control" of a moderately priced cookbook. What I mean is that basic blocks/recipes are just "updated" on the fly without the typical deep-dive R&D to prove them prior to publishing.

I say this because my copy of this book has a lot of paper slips with passages re-written in red ink pasted on top of the erroneous areas.
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#6 Sator

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 11:32 AM

This specific book was written to demonstrate that T&C systems could be adapted for the emerging fashions of the era. I believe - and this is only my opinion - that it was written with the speed "quality control" of a moderately priced cookbook. What I mean is that basic blocks/recipes are just "updated" on the fly without the typical deep-dive R&D to prove them prior to publishing.

I say this because my copy of this book has a lot of paper slips with passages re-written in red ink pasted on top of the erroneous areas.


My copy also has those corrections glued onto them. I also agree that the T&C of the 1970s seemed over anxious to appeal to the bleeding edge of casual fashion at the time. The journal issues of this era also confirms this. They seemed to have gone overboard on this compared to '70s Rundschau issues which do make plenty of concessions to fashion but maintain their roots in classical tailored styles. The 1970s T&C is neither fish nor fowl in that it can't make up its mind whether it is trying to appeal to casual apparel industry cutters or to bespoke tailors. I suspect this was their undoing.

#7 greger

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:17 AM

One, there was starting to be a lack of tailors and there was certainly more demand for causual clothing than in the past.

The other part of T&C is so much of the past few decades they went through so much, if you repeat it to soon, even though it is updated, you would loose some of the buyers of the T&C, because they already have the knowledge and they already have enough expirence to up date new stuff on there own. So that is probably why causual wear is where they went.

The new T&C magazine charges a lot for so little. It is sorta thrown together at the last minute and put on a web page (I never saw one pattern of anything out of 12 issues of one year). The old had a graphic artist ($), printer ($) and mailed it by snail mail ($) (weekly?) and they charged so little, although they did have advertisments in them to help pay the cost. Nowadays, there are even newer patterns today, if you shell out a huge amount of money for the cutting class. I wonder if an old employee started it up again. I hope they do well and figure out how to meet the needs of todays young tailors.

I believe one of the books has a "sweat pants" pattern, which I'd like to see, along with all the others in the books.
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