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Selig Brothers "Correct Dress Chart" 1928


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#19 Sator

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Posted 12 February 2010 - 09:35 AM

I stand corrected. I thought it was acceptable because the Duke of Windsor had done it (yeah, I know, "the Duke of Windsor did it" is not a very good reason for doing something), but, after poking around a bit, I have observed that the DoW started wearing a white waistcoat at some point.



Maybe you are right. Perhaps he did. Could it have been an older photo?

You can always ask yourself if what Bridgland, Whife or Barney wrote between the 1930-50s is still relevant today. Even Roetzel says you should wear a white waistcoat. Who at a ball today would call out to a man to fetch a drink just because he is wearing a black waistcoat?

#20 PocketTriangle

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 07:50 AM

Maybe you are right. Perhaps he did. Could it have been an older photo?

You can always ask yourself if what Bridgland, Whife or Barney wrote between the 1930-50s is still relevant today. Even Roetzel says you should wear a white waistcoat. Who at a ball today would call out to a man to fetch a drink just because he is wearing a black waistcoat?


I've found the evening suit. It is here: http://www.metmuseum...D=80003360&vT=1

According to the page, it was made somewhere between 1938 and 1965 (although the 1965 part could just refer to the replacement trousers). In this picture (http://3.bp.blogspot...n white tie.jpg) the DoW, looking quite old (so I'm guessing the photo dates from the mid-to-late 1960s) is wearing a white waistcoat. So it appears that the DoW made the switch some time between 1938 and the 60s. Perhaps he was a bit slow to change because, as a highly recognizable public figure, he was unlikely to be mistaken for a waiter?

Of course, you are probably right that the choice of waistcoat is a bit of a moot point. Even if one were lucky enough to be invited to a white tie event (they are quite rare these days), it would be unlikely that anyone else would be as thoroughly acquainted with the subtleties of formal evening dress to make the distinction.

#21 Sator

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 07:55 AM

After my last post, I remembered seeing that dress suit. It is midnight blue. I also recall that there might have been an old fashioned rule about wearing a black waistcoat when in mourning, but I have never read it in print. It used to be common that some obscure member of the Royal family would pass away and in an instant everyone had to dress accordingly. Maybe that's why he had a matching waistcoat made. I guess if midnight is "blacker than black" it should be fine for mourning (???)

#22 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 08:21 AM

Midnight is not proper for mourning at all, too colourful! . The typical fabrics for mourning was crepe and barathea :thumbsup:
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#23 Sator

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 08:23 AM

Is that written anywhere or just your opinion? I usually can't tell the difference between midnight and black anyway.

#24 Sator

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Posted 13 February 2010 - 08:26 AM

Posted Image

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#25 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 01:25 AM

mid-night is a blue black and black is a black of either green/black or brown/black hues. Under certain lighting such as evening event lighting it has the appearance of being blacker than black, but in the sun it's obviously blue... at least the garments I've seen in person. I am sure it varies from mill to mill and dye lot.

Black crepes, georgettes and barathea weaves were developed specially for mourning, but eventually found itself in common use.
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!




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