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Pant Draft


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#1 lionessa

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 05:43 PM

New to this forum and tailoring so bear with me. I was wondering if some of the basic pant's drafts for men on this website will work for women, and what the differences (besides the most obvious part) might be if not. I have been going to a fashion program where the draft of women's pants are from the book Building Patterns: Architecture of Women's pants by Suzy Furrer. I havn't been happy with the way my trousers have been turning out, even with tweaking, and chalking it up to my inexperience. Just doing some basic online research, I'm seeing other systems that appear more complex particularly in the slant at the waistline and how the back piece is shaped and runs into the leg. I can post the book instructions or my draft if that will help.Would welcome any illumination on the subject to be offered. Pointed direction towards other drafts also appreciated.

Finally, would like to say that the information and discussion on this website has done more to address questions that I've been tearing my hair out about than any other source. Thanks!

Edited by lionessa, 22 February 2010 - 06:22 PM.


#2 EllaQ

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 05:55 PM

I have never heard of that book or the author. Is it only used in the school you attend?
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#3 lionessa

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 06:21 PM

I have never heard of that book or the author. Is it only used in the school you attend?


I believe the author runs her own school in San Francisco (I am not a student there, but I don't know which other schools might use it). The text we use for pattern drafting (other than pants) is the Armstrong book, which also has a pant draft, although I have not yet tried it. Both seem to produce a straight up and down pant, that look less like the Rundschau particularly on the behind panel.

#4 jukes

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 12:49 AM

A mans trouser draft will not normally work for women, especially on a close fitting trouser, women tend to have more on the hips and the front rise needs to be shaped differently (obviously) the fit at the thigh will also differ.

#5 Padme

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 11:47 AM

I've heard that Armstrong's book is for the trade, or for a preset of measurements. Your body may be short or long and not according to a standard grade of measurements. If you look at her beginning chapters. You might look at Connie Crawford's Patternmaking made Easy or European Cut by Elizabeth Allemong. I just finished two classes with Don McCunn and he uses your measurements. You still have to do the mock up and tweak it from there.

#6 jcsprowls

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:01 PM

That is incorrect. Any pattern drafting text teaches the mechanics of drafting using standard measurements. Once you learn the system, you can then substitute personal measures and make a custom pattern.

You will *always* have to prove a draft by sewing up the muslin, trying on, and adjusting the pattern.
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#7 Kerry

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 02:36 PM

Armstrong's book, Patternmaking for Fashion Design is good as a reference text and covers almost every imaginable draft. The drafts are presented in the instructions as block drafts but are personal blocks that you create at the start of the book. It was the book used for a course I attended in the early 1990's. Between this and Natalie Bray, they are the most referred to ladies dressmaking draft books I use.


As for the trouser draft, it has good and bad points. I have fitted over 200 pants using a modified version of her draft and I do not recall any major fitting issues. They were all skinny-ish dancers though. I haven't tried it on a full hipped or curvy lady and imagine there would be more issues with the fit.

Definitely find a ladies trouser draft rather than a mens one. The MTOC doesn't have one and neither does Natalie Bray (I think her second book might) which is why I end up using Armstrong. Another alternative book is Winifred Aldrich which is very easy to follow.
http://www.amazon.co...ntt_at_ep_dpi_1

#8 greger

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 05:14 PM

The MTOC has one, I think, in the 2nd or 3rd. volume. I'm not a women, so I never tried it.

#9 Kerry

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 06:41 PM

The MTOC has one, I think, in the 2nd or 3rd. volume. I'm not a women, so I never tried it.


Posted Image I can't believe that I just found it. After I don't know how many years, it appears I was using the wrong terninology. SLACKS! All of 2 pages worth. Just a minute and I will post it.Posted Image

#10 Kerry

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 06:46 PM

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#11 Sator

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 09:55 AM

Posted Image I can't believe that I just found it. After I don't know how many years, it appears I was using the wrong terninology. SLACKS! All of 2 pages worth. Just a minute and I will post it.Posted Image


That's because in British English "pants" refers to to something quite different! This is what UK Google turned up on the subject of "pants":

http://www.dailymail...kely-trend.html

Posted Image

I've noticed that British English sartorial terms are slowing being killed off by American English ones.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#12 Kerry

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:10 AM

I was actually looking up the index under "trousers" so in Kerry-logic if they had "trousers, gentleman's" then for ladies they would have listed "trousers, ladies". You know what they say about assumptions...

#13 Sator

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:33 AM

I think back in those days it had a negative ring about it when a "proper" lady "wore the trouser". So they called them "slacks" instead to make them sound ladylike.
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#14 Sator

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:39 AM

Here's something hilarious from the UK. Kylie Pants and Kanga Pants!

http://www.inco-dire...ontinence Pants
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#15 J. Maclochlainn

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:45 AM

wow, Sator, simply wow :twitch:
Silly Cognoscenti, Drape is for windows!

#16 greger

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:50 AM

I think back in those days it had a negative ring about it when a "proper" lady "wore the trouser". So they called them "slacks" instead to make them sound ladylike.


What was it the late 60s or early 70s when Pant Suits came in. Before that women wore dresses and skirts or jeans in the US. No women wore pants to church until Pant Suits were invented.

Around here girls were still required to wear dresses or skirts in elementary and middle school at least to 1970. High school was different.

#17 Sator

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:54 AM

Now before we blokes get severely slapped on the wrist for dragging down the tone of conversation, here is something more on subject from A.A. Whife on cutting ladies' trousers/slacks:

http://www.cutterand...p?showtopic=991
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"

#18 Sator

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Posted 24 February 2010 - 10:55 AM

No women wore pants to church until Pant Suits were invented.


But were they Kylie pants? These were exhibited at the Victoria and Albert Museum:

Posted Image

What would have Queen Victoria said?
Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): "Tradition ist die Weitergabe des Feuers und nicht die Anbetung der Asche."

"Tradition is about passing on the flame, and not the worshipping of ashes"




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